Reliques of Ancient English Poetry: Consisting of Old Heroic Ballads, Songs and Other Pieces of the Earlier Poets, with Some of Later Date, Not Included in Any Other Ed. to which is Now Added a Supplement of Many Curious Historical and Narrative Ballads, Reprinted from Rare Copies with a Copious Glossary and Notes (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Thomas Percy
F. Bell, 1860 - Ballads, English - 558 pages
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Contents

Edward Edward A Scottish Ballad
70
King Estmere
71
On the word Termagant
76
Robin Hood and Guy of Gisborne
77
An Elegy on Henry Fourth Earl of North umberland by Skelton
82
The Tower of Doctrine by Stephen Hawea
86
The Child of Elle
87
Edom Adam oGordon A Scottish Ballad
90
Containing Ballads that Illustrate Shaktpeare Essay on the Origin of the English Stage
93
BOOK THE SECOND PAGE
100
Adam Bell Clym o the Clough and Wil liam of Cloudesly
104
The aged Lover renounceth Love
113
Jepthah Judge of Israel
114
A Robyn Jolly Robyn
115
A Song to the Lute in Musicke
116
King Cophetua and the Beggarmaid
117
Take thy old Cloak about thee
119
Willow Willow Willow
120
Sir Lancelot du Lake
122
Corydons Farewell to Phillis
124
Gernutus the Jew of Venice
125
The Passionate Shepherd to his Love by Marlow
128
The Nymphs Reply by Sir W Raleigh
129
Take those Lips away
132
Youth and Age by Shakspeare
135
The Friar of Orders Gray
137
The more modern Ballad of Chevy Chase
141
Hlustration of the Northern Names
145
The Rising in the North
146
Northumberland betrayed by Douglas
149
My Mind to me a Kingdome is
153
The Patient Countess by W Warner
154
Dowsabell by Drayton
157
The Farewell to Love from Beaumont and Fletcher
159
Cupids Pastime by Davison
160
The Character of a Happy Life by Sir H Wotton
161
Gildoroy A Scottish Ballad
162
Winifreda
163
The Witch of Wokey
164
Bryan and Pereene A West India Ballad by Dr Grainger
165
Gentle River Gentle River Translated from the Spanish
166
Alcanzar and Zayda a Moorish Tale
169
SERIES THE SECOND BOOK THE FIRST 1 Richard of Almaigne
171
On the Death of King Edward I
172
An original Ballad by Chaucer
174
The Turnament of Tottenham
175
For the Victory at Agincourt
179
The Notbrowne Mayd
180
A Balet by the Earl Rivers
185
Cupids Assault By Lord Vaux
186
Sir Aldingar
188
The Gaberlnnzie Man Scottish By King James V
191
On Thomas Lord Cromwell
192
Harpalus An Ancient English Pastoral
194
Robin and Makyne An ancient Scottish Pastoral
195
Gentle Herdsman tell to me
197
King Edward IV and the Tanner of Taui worth
199
As ye came from the Holy Land
202
Hardyknute A Scottish Fragment By Sir J Bruco
203
A Ballad of Luther the Pope a Cardinal and a Husbandman
209
John Anderson my Jo A Scottish Song
211
Little John Nobody
212
Queen Elizabeths Verses while Prisoner at Woodstock
214
Gascoignos Praise of the fair Bridges afterwards Lady Sandes
218
Fair Rosamond By Thomas Delono
220
Queen Eleanors Confession
224
The Sturdy Rock
226
An Essay on the word Fit and the Ancient Ballnd Singing
231
Fancy and Desire By the Earl of Oxford
233
Sir Andrew Barton
234
Lady Anne Bothwells Lament A Scot tish Song
239
The Murder of the King of Scots
240
A Sonnet by Queen Elizabeth
241
Corins Fate
259
Corydons Doleful Knell
264
Essay on tho Metro of Pierce Plowmans Visions
265
The Complaint of Conscience
272
Plain Truth and Blind Ignorance
274
The Wandering Jew
276
The Lyo By Sir W Raleigh
278
Verses viz two Sonnets by King James I
279
King John and the Abbot of Canterbury
280
You Meaner Beauties By Sir H Wotton 2S3 8 The Old and Young Courtier
283
Sir John Sucklings Campaigne
285
To Althea from Prison By Col Lovelace
286
The Downfall of Charing Cross
287
Verses by King Charles I
289
The Sale of Rebellious Household Stuff
290
The Baffled Knight or Ladys Policy
292
Why so Pale? By Sir John Suckling
294
The Distracted Puritan Mad Song the Second
296
The Lunatic Lover Mad Song tho Third
297
The Lady Distracted with Love Mad Song tho Fourth
298
The Frantic Lady Mad Song the Sixth
299
LilliBurlero By Lord Wharton
300
The Braes of Yarrow In Imitation of the ancient Scottish Manner By W Hamil ton
301
Admiral Hosiers Ghost By Mr Glover
303
Jemmy Dawson By Mr Shenstone
304
SERIES THE THIRD BOOK THE FIRST
305
Essay on the Ancient Metrical Romances
306
The Boy and the Mantle
321
The Marriage of Sir Gawaine
324
King Ryences Challenge
328
King Arthurs Death A Fragment
329
The Legend of King Arthur
332
A Dyttie to Hey Downe
333
Glasgerion
334
Old Robin of Portingale
335
Child Waters
337
Phillida and Corydon By Nio Breton
340
Little Musgravo and Lady Barnard
341
Tho Ewbughts Marion A Scottish Song
343
The Shepherds Address to his Muse By N Breton
345
Cupid and Campaspe By John Lilye
347
Gil Child Morricc A Scottish Ballad
349
The Legend of Sir Guy
352
Guy and Amarant By Sam Rowlands
354
Tho Auld Goodman A Scottish Song
358
Barbara Allens Cruelty
360
Sweet Williams Ghost A Scottish Ballad
361
Sir John Grehme and Barbara Allan Ditto
362
Tho W illow Tree A Pastoral Dialogue
363
Tho Ladys Fall
364
Waly Waly Love be bonny A Scottish Song
366
Dulcina
368
The Lady Isabellas Tragedy
369
A Hue and Cry after Cupid By Ben Jon son
370
The King of Frances Daughter
371
The Sweet Neglect By Bon Jonson
374
A Lover of Late was I
376
The King and the Miller of Mansfield
377
The Shepherds Resolution By G Wither
381
Queen Dido or the Wandering Prince of Troy
382
The Witches Song By Ben Jonson
384
Robin Goodfellow
385
The Fairy Queen
390
Ballad
398
Herinit of Warkworth
435
Robin Hoods Death and Burial
447
The Frere and the Boye
454
How a Mcrchande dyd hys Wyfe betray
465
The Life and Death of Tom Thumbe
477
The Lovers Quarrel or Cupids Triumph
487
How the Wise Man taught his
495
Sir Gillnm of Mydoltoun
502
GLOSSARY i
543

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 493 - One touch to her hand, and one word in her ear, When they reached the hall door, and the charger stood near; So light to the croupe the fair lady he swung, So light to the saddle before her he sprung ! "She is won ! we are gone, over bank, bush, and scaur ! They'll have fleet steeds that follow !
Page 493 - So stately his form, and so lovely her face, That never a hall such a galliard did grace; While her mother did fret, and her father did fume, And the bridegroom stood dangling his bonnet and plume...
Page 409 - TELL me not, Sweet, I am unkind That from the nunnery Of thy chaste breast and quiet mind, To war and arms I fly. True, a new mistress now I chase, The first foe in the field ; And with a stronger faith embrace A sword, a horse, a shield. Yet this inconstancy is such As you too shall adore; I could not love thee, Dear, so much, Loved I not Honour more.
Page 162 - Who God doth late and early pray, More of his grace than gifts to lend, And entertains the harmless day, With a religious book or friend. This man is freed from servile bands Of hope to rise, or fear to fall ; Lord of himself, though not of lands, And having nothing, yet hath all.
Page 493 - Twere better by far, To have malcli'd our fair cousin with young Lochinvar." One touch to her hand, and one word in her ear, When they reach'd the hall door, and the charger stood near, So light to the croupe the fair lady he swung, So light to the saddle before her he sprung! " She is won ! we aie gone, over bank, bush, and scaur; They'll have fleet steeds that follow!
Page xx - ... or else by blind harpers or such like taverne minstrels that give a fit of mirth for a groat, and their matters being for the most part stories of old time, as the tale of sir Topas, the reportes of Bevis of Southampton, Guy of Warwicke, Adam Bell, and Clymme of the Clough, and such other old romances or historicall rimes, made purposely for recreation of the common people at christmasse diners and brideales, and in tavernes and alehouses, and such other places of base resort.
Page 51 - I never heard the old song of Percy and Douglas that I found not my heart moved more than with a trumpet...
Page 146 - Some men with swords may reap the field, And plant fresh laurels where they kill: But their strong nerves at last must yield; They tame but one another still: Early or late They stoop to fate, And must give up their murmuring breath, When they, pale captives, creep to death. The garlands wither on your brow, Then boast no more your mighty deeds; Upon Death's purple altar now See, where the victor-victim bleeds: Your heads must come To the cold tomb; Only the actions of the just Smell sweet, and blossom...
Page 128 - Come live with me, and be my love. And we will some new pleasures prove Of golden sands, and crystal brooks, With silken lines, and silver hooks.
Page 286 - Enlarged winds, that curl the flood, Know no such liberty. Stone walls do not a prison make, Nor iron bars a cage; Minds innocent and quiet take That for an hermitage; If I have freedom in my love And in my soul am free, Angels alone, that soar above, Enjoy such liberty.

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