Immigration and the Future (Google eBook)

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Doran, 1920 - United States - 260 pages
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Page 62 - Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America, in Congress assembled, that any act committed in any state or territory of the United States in violation of the rights of a citizen or subject of a foreign country secured to such citizen or subject by treaty between the United States and such foreign country, which act constitutes a crime under the laws of such state or territory, shall constitute a like crime against the peace and dignity of the United States,...
Page 61 - ... disfranchise any number of citizens at pleasure, by general descriptions, it may soon confine all the votes to a small number of partisans, and establish an aristocracy or an oligarchy. If it may banish at discretion, all those whom particular circumstances render obnoxious, without hearing or trial, no man can be safe, nor know when he may be the innocent victim of a prevailing faction. The name of liberty applied to such a government, would be a mockery of common sense.
Page 157 - Furthermore, it should provide for reserves to be called upon when needed and to be taken care of when idle. The very nature of American industry makes such an organization of the labor market an imperative duty and involves at the outset a consideration of immigration; for certain industries are almost wholly dependent upon immigrant labor, as it is impossible to secure for them a native supply at any price.
Page 61 - Legislature. The dangerous consequences of this power are manifest. If the Legislature can disfranchise any number of citizens at pleasure, by general descriptions, it may soon confine all the votes to a small number of partisans, and establish an aristocracy or an oligarchy. If it may banish at...
Page 157 - The first responsibility of industry is to see that America has a sufficient supply of labor to maintain American production with a fair margin of profit, and at the lowest possible price to the consumer.
Page 246 - ... antipathies against others, it has served very much to divide the community and to distract our councils. It has been often likely to compromit the interests of our own country in favor of another. The permanent effect of such a policy will be, that in times of great public danger there will be always a numerous body of men, of whom there may be just grounds of distrust; the suspicion alone will weaken the strength of the nation, but their force may be actually employed in assisting an invader.
Page 33 - ... were used exclusively for immigrants who had arrived at New York within four years from the date they sought care or support from the public authorities. The commissioners also leased in 1855 the building in New York City known as Castle Garden and converted it into a landing place for immigrants. At Castle Garden, after examination of their luggage by the customs officers, the immigrants were transferred to the landing depot, where they were received by officers of the commission, who entered...
Page 106 - Nation], with the proceeds of his own manual labor — he was a factory worker at that time because of his ignorance of the English language—and with some voluntary contributions made by a handful of Albanians. The people to whom he sent the newspaper, gratis at the beginning, wondered what it was for; they not only had never seen an Albanian newspaper, but also they were entirely illiterate.
Page 61 - Nothing is more common than for a free people, in times of heat and violence, to gratify momentary passions, by letting into the government principles and precedents which afterwards prove fatal to themselves. Of this kind is the doctrine of disqualification, disfranchisement, and banishment by acts of the legislature. The dangerous consequences of this power are manifest. If the legislature can disfranchise any number of citizens at pleasure by general descriptions...
Page 66 - Faith and justice between nations are virtues of a nature the most necessary and sacred. They cannot be too strongly inculcated, nor too highly respected. Their obligations are absolute, their utility unquestionable; they relate to objects which, with probity and sincerity, generally admit of being brought within clear and intelligible rules. But the same cannot be said of gratitude. It is not very often...

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