The Popular Science Monthly, Volume 26 (Google eBook)

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D. Appleton, 1885 - Technology
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Page 586 - Gavest thou the goodly wings unto the peacocks? or wings and feathers unto the ostrich? Which leaveth her eggs in the earth, and warmeth them in dust, And forgetteth that the foot may crush them, or that the wild beast may break them.
Page 780 - Amid the mysteries which become the more mysterious the more they are thought about, there will remain the ONE absolute certainty, that he is ever in the presence of an Infinite and Eternal Energy from which all things proceed.
Page 277 - Subjects to confirm and establish the Christian Faith, and to confute all heretics and schismatics upon the divine authority of the holy Scriptures upon the authority of the writings of the primitive Fathers, as to the faith and practice of the primitive Church upon the Divinity of our Lord and Saviour Jesns Christ upon the Divinity of the Holy Ghost upon the Articles of the Christian Faith, as comprehended in the Apostles
Page 336 - The path of duty was the way to glory; He that walks it, only thirsting For the right, and learns to deaden Love of self, before his journey closes, He shall find the stubborn thistle bursting Into glossy purples, which outredden All voluptuous garden-roses. Not once or twice in our fair island-story, The path of duty was the way to glory; He, that ever following her commands. On with toil of heart and knees and hands. Thro...
Page 783 - Is it not just possible that there is a mode of being as much transcending Intelligence and Will, as these transcend mechanical motion ? It is true that we are totally unable to conceive any such higher mode of being.
Page 601 - ... one general law, leading to the advancement of all organic beings, namely, multiply, vary, let the strongest live and the weakest die.
Page 245 - Bacon, that the words of prophecy are to be interpreted as the words of one 'with whom a thousand years are as one day, and one day as a thousand years.
Page 170 - It is the essence of the act of observing ; for the observer is not he who merely sees the thing which is before his eyes, but he who sees what parts that thing is composed of. To do this well is a rare talent. One person, from inattention, or attending only in the wrong place, overlooks half of what he sees ; another sets down much more than he sees, confounding it with what he imagines, or with what he infers; another takes note of the kind of all the circumstances, but...
Page 172 - It may be said that the fact makes a stronger impression on the boy through the medium of his sight, that he believes it the more confidently. I say that this ought not to be the case. If he does not believe the statements of his tutor probably a clergyman of mature knowledge, recognised ability, and blameless character his suspicion is irrational, and manifests a want of the power of appreciating evidence, a want fatal to his success in that branch of science which he is supposed to be cultivating.
Page 317 - Those who think that science is dissipating religious beliefs and sentiments, seem unaware that whatever of mystery is taken from the old interpretation is added to the new. Or rather, we may say that transference from the one to the other is accompanied by increase; since, for an explanation which has a seeming feasibility, science substitutes an explanation which, carrying us back only a certain distance, there leaves us in presence of the avowedly inexplicable.

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