The Beauties of England and Wales, or, Delineations, topographical, historical, and descriptive, of each county, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

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Printed by Thomas Maiden, for Vernor and Hood [and 6 others], 1803 - Architecture
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Page 139 - Here Reynolds is laid, and to tell you my mind, He has not left a wiser or better behind : His pencil was striking, resistless, and grand : His manners were gentle, complying, and bland ; Still born to improve us in every part, His pencil our faces, his manners our heart : To coxcombs averse, yet most civilly steering, When they judged without skill he was still hard of hearing.
Page 435 - In the hole of the desk were store of tobacco pipes that had been used. " On one side of this end of the room was the door of a closet wherein stood the strong beer and the wine, which never came thence but in single glasses, that being the rule of the house exactly observed ; for he never exceeded in drink or permitted it. On the other side was the door of an old chapel, not used for devotion.
Page 89 - And they asked him, saying, Master, we know that thou sayest and teachest rightly, neither acceptest thou the person of any, but teachest the way of God truly : 22 Is it lawful for us to give tribute unto Caesar, or no? 23 But he perceived their craftiness, and said unto them, Why tempt ye me ? 24 Shew me a penny.
Page 435 - Martyrs ; on the tables were hawks' hoods, bells, and such like, two or three old green hats with their crowns thrust in so as to hold ten or a dozen eggs, which were of...
Page 504 - Pensive hast follow'd to the silent tomb, Steer'd the same course to the same quiet shore, Not parted long, and now to part no more ! Go, then, where only bliss sincere is known! Go, where to love and to enjoy are one! Yet take these tears, mortality's relief, And till we share your joys, forgive our grief: These little rites, a stone, a verse receive, 'Tis all a father, all a friend can give!
Page 434 - ... he had a walk in the New Forest and the manor of Christ Church. This last supplied him with red deer, sea and river fish; and indeed all his neighbours...
Page 434 - His house was perfectly of the old fashion, in the midst of a large park well stocked with deer, and near the house rabbits to serve his kitchen, many...
Page 87 - After a grateful commemoration of the fifty-five years of union and happiness which he enjoyed with Mabel his wife, the good earl thus speaks from the tomb : What we gave, we have ; What we spent, we had ; What we left, we lost...
Page 436 - He was well natured, but soon angry ; calling his servants bastards and cuckoldy knaves ; in one of which he often spoke truth to his own knowledge, and sometimes in both, though of the same man. He lived to...
Page 253 - Here die I, Richard Grenvile, with a joyful and quiet mind; for that I have ended my life as a true soldier ought, fighting for his country, queen, religion, and honour: my soul willingly departing from this body, leaving behind the lasting fame of having behaved as every valiant soldier is in his duty bound to do.

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