Silence Dogood, the Busy-Body, and Early Writings: Boston and London, 1722-1726, Philadelphia, 1726-1757, London, 1757-1775

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Library of America, 2002 - Literary Collections - 823 pages
3 Reviews
A selection of writings from the philosopher, statesman, scientist, and civic leader includes articles, satires, essays, personal correspondence, letters to the press, and pamphlets.

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Review: Silence Dogood, The Busy-Body, and Early Writings (Library of America: Benjamin Franklin #1)

User Review  - Steven Walle - Goodreads

Benjjamin Franklin was a great writer and a strong moralist. These writings were printed in a competators news paper from his cousin's because his cousin would not publish his writings. Enjoyable. Read full review

Review: Silence Dogood, The Busy-Body, and Early Writings (Library of America: Benjamin Franklin #1)

User Review  - Dan Rundquist - Goodreads

Outstanding. I am never disappointed reading his clever works. Read full review

Contents

Hugo Grim on Silence Dogood December 31722
43
On Titles of Honour February 18 17223
49
Abigail Twitterfield July 8 1723
56
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Benjamin Franklin, statesman, philosopher, and man of letters, was born in Boston in 1706 of Protestant parents. He entered Boston Grammar School when he was eight and later attended George Brown Ell's school. When he was twelve his father apprenticed him to his half-brother James as a printer. James was later the publisher of the New England Courant, where Franklin's first articles, The Dogood Papers, were published before he was seventeen. He went to Philadelphia in 1723 and pursued his trade of printer. He was befriended by William Keith, Governor of Pennsylvania, who offered to help the young man get started in business. Franklin left for England, where he hoped to arrange for the purchase of printing equipment. Arriving in London in 1724, he was soon deserted by Keith, and again turned to printing for a livelihood. His privately printed Dissertation on Liberty and Necessity, Pleasure and Pain (1725) introduced him to leading Deists and other intellectuals in London. A year later, he returned to Philadelphia, and by 1730 he had been appointed public printer for Pennsylvania. In 1731 he established the first circulation library in the United States; in 1743-44, The American Philosophical Society. In 1748 he retired from the trade of printer but continued to advise and back his partner and to draw profit from the business. Poor Richard's Almanack was his most spectacular success as a publisher, having gone through numerous editions and been translated in many languages. During the next thirty-five years he devoted himself largely to politics and diplomacy, but still wrote and engaged in scientific ventures. He resigned as Minister to France in 1785, returned to America, and was elected President of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Still concerned with the rights of the individual, he published papers encouraging the abolition of slavery. He died in Philadelphia in 1790.

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