Basic Betacam and DVCPRO camerawork

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Focal Press, 1998 - Performing Arts - 218 pages
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Basic Betacam and DVCPro Camerawork explains the operational controls of the latest popular camera formats, illustrating their significance to routine news gathering and basic location recording. This new edition takes into account the very latest developments in camera technology, including more on: Digital cameras Computer menus and smart cards Switchable aspect ratio cameras Digital Betacam and BetacamSX DVCPro and DVCAM formats Digital-S and disc-recording camcorders DV formats Video journalism Satellite News Gathering Future developments Written as a practical guide, the step-by-step instructions take you through everything you need to know from adjusting the camera prior to recording, to information on typical operational controls and the basic production technique required for broadcasting. The book is a combination of technical explanation and practical advice aimed at the less experienced broadcast camera operator or film cameraman converting to video. It is also an ideal text for students on media and television production courses. Peter Ward is a camerawork trainer working with International Training and Television Consultancy, writer and freelance cameraman. The latest digital formats covered. Basic operational controls described. An excellent beginner's guide containing practical advice on how to get the best results.

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Contents

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
7
THE DIGITAL SIGNAL
14
NONLINEAR EDITING
20
Copyright

12 other sections not shown

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About the author (1998)

Peter Ward and Don Brownlee are the co-authors of the acclaimed and bestselling "Rare Earth," Ward is a professor of geological science and zoology at the University of Washington and the author of nine other books, including "Future Evolution, The Call of Distant Mammoths," and "The End of Evolution," which was a finalist for the "Los Angeles Times" Book Prize. Brownlee is a professor of astronomy at the University of Washington.

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