The Chirurgical Works of Percival Pott ...: To which are Added a Short Account of the Life of the Author, a Method of Curing the Hydrocele by Injection and Occasional Notes and Observations by Sir James Earle, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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J. Johnson, 1808
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Page 27 - I therefore must repeat my advice, to let it remain unmoved for a week or ten days, at the end of which time it will have accomplished its end, and then had better be removed than not.
Page 180 - In other cases of a cancerous nature, in which the habit is too frequently concerned, we have not often so fair a prospect of success by the removal of the distempered part; and are obliged to be content with means, which I wish 1 could say were truly palliative.
Page 114 - ... how does he escape the charge of asserting a like despotism? What in relation to mental freedom is the difference in principle in saying that we are to believe what the Church teaches, or that we are bound to believe what the Bible teaches? The rule is as absolute in the one case as in the other, and the only difference is, that in the one case we have a living teacher, with regard to whose teaching there is no obscurity or uncertainty, while in the other we have a dead book, whose teachings...
Page 190 - So, that having very foon after another opportunity, I did not care to truft to opium alone, but joined the bark with it. The event was equally fortunate. But although...
Page 220 - This may very probably be one reason why the ligature is in general so unsuccessful. The want of collateral branches of sufficient size to carry on the circulation, is another very powerful impediment. Whether these may be allowed sufficient to frustrate the attempt by the operation, I will not take upon me to say; but certain I am, that it does not succeed: I have tried it myself more than once or...
Page 220 - I am, that it does not succeed: I have tried it myself more than once or twice; I have seen it tried by others; but the event has always been fatal. Excessive pain, a high degree of symptomatic fever, great tension of the whole limb, rapidly tending to gangrene, and ending in mortification both upwards and downwards, have destroyed all those whom I have seen, on whom the operation of tying the artery has been practised. Nor have. I ever seen any other operation than that of amputation, which has...
Page 72 - ... more than one sinus exists, similar proceedings are necessary. This operation will alone insure a radical cure, but requires some caution in its performance. The introduction of a sharp-pointed and cutting instrument along a fistula in ano is attended with some risk. Percival Pott said, truly, that "in all chirurgic operations the instrument made use of cannot be too simple, nor too keen, and, if possible, should never be out of the sight, or the direction of the finger, of the operator ; and...
Page 270 - ... caries of the body, or bodies of one, or more of the vertebrae ; from this proceed all the ills whether general, or local, apparent, or concealed ; this causes the ill-health of the patient and in time the curvature.
Page 237 - ... he finds that his legs involuntarily cross each other, by which he is frequently thrown down, and that without stumbling; upon endeavouring to stand still and erect, without support, even for a few minutes, his knees give way and bend forward. When the...
Page 177 - ... there is a disease as peculiar to a certain set of people, which has not, at least to my knowledge, been publicly noticed; I mean the chimneysweepers' cancer. It is a disease which always makes its first attack on, and its first appearance in, the inferior part of the scrotum; where it produces a superficial, painful, ragged, ill-looking sore, with hard and rising edges: the trade call it the soot-wart.

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