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Books Books 1 - 10 of 13 on But how we are to collect," says Newton in the Scholium at the end of the Definitions,....  
" But how we are to collect," says Newton in the Scholium at the end of the Definitions, "the true motions from their causes, effects, and apparent differences, and vice versa ; how from the motions, either true or apparent, we may come to the knowledge... "
The science of mechanics: a critical and historical account of its ... - Page 34
by Ernst Mach - 1915 - 106 pages
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The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy, Volume 1

Sir Isaac Newton, John Machin - Celestial mechanics - 1729
...are to colled the true motions from their caufes, effcds, and apparent differences ; and vice verfi, how from the motions, either true or apparent, we may come to the knowledge of their caufes and effeds, (ball be expkin'd more at large in the following Trad. For to this end it was that...
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Encyclopædia britannica: or, A dictionary of arts ..., Volume 13, Part 1

Colin Macfarquhar, George Gleig - Reference - 1797
...effects, and apparent differences ; and vice feveral parts of thofe heavens and the planets, which ver/a, how, from the motions, either true or apparent, we may come to the knowledge of the-ir caufrs and effefts. are indeed relatively at reit in their heavens, <!o yet really move. For they change...
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Pantologia. A new (cabinet) cyclopædia, by J.M. Good, O. Gregory, and N ...

John Mason Good, Olinthus Gilbert Gregory - 1819
...to collect the true motions from their causes, effects, and apparent differences ; and vice vfrtm, how, from the motions, .either true or apparent, we may come to the knowledge of their causes and eff'cts. In order to this, he lays down tue following axioms or laws of motion. 1. Every body perseveres...
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Pantologia. A new (cabinet) cyclopædia, by J.M. Good, O. Gregory, and N ...

John Mason Good, Olinthus Gilbert Gregory - 1813
...of their motions. Having thus explained himself, sir baac proposes to shotf ho\v \ve aie to collect the true motions from their causes, effects, and apparent differences; and vice i-ena, how, from the motions, either true or apparent, we may come to the knowledge of their causes...
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A philosophical and mathematical dictionary: containing an ..., Volume 2

Charles Hutton - Science - 1815
...Relative, Apparent, True, Real, &c. After •which, the author proposes to show how we are to collect the true motions from their causes, effects, and apparent...from the motions, either true or apparent, we may arrive at the knowledge of their causes and effects. In order to this, he lays down the following axioms...
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Encyclopaedia Perthensis; Or Universal Dictionary of the Arts ..., Volume 16

Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1816
...to collect the true motions from their caufes, effects, and apparent differences ; and vice verja, how, from the motions, either true or apparent, we may come to the knowledge of their caufes and effects. In order to this, he lays down the following axioms or laws of motion. i. EVERY...
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The London encyclopaedia, or, Universal dictionary of science, art ...

Thomas Curtis (of Grove house sch, Islington)
...LAWS OF MOTION. Having thus explained himself Sir Isaac Newton proposes to show how we are to collect the true motions from their causes, effects, and apparent...come to the knowledge of their causes and effects. In order to this, he lays down the following axioms or laws of motion. 1 . Every body perseveres in...
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Van Nostrand's Eclectric Engineering Magazine, Volume 17

Engineering - 1877
...globes among the bodies, we should find the determination of their motions. But how we are to collect the true motions from their causes, effects, and apparent...shall be explained more at large in the following tract. For to this end it was that I composed it." Newton immediately goes on from this to state his...
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The Science of Mechanics: A Critical and Historical Account of Its ...

Ernst Mach - Mechanics - 1915 - 106 pages
...the rotating water-bucket (pp. 9, n) — he believed that he could prove an absolute rotation, though he could not prove any absolute translation. By absolute...shall be explained more at large in the following Tract. " The resting sphere of fixed stars seems to have made a certain impression on Newton as well....
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The Edge of Objectivity: An Essay in the History of Scientific Ideas

Charles Coulston Gillispie - Science - 1960 - 562 pages
...the closing sentence of the final definition at the start of the Principia: "But how we are to obtain the true motions from their causes, effects, and apparent differences, and vice versa, how from their motions either true or apparent, we may come to the knowledge of their causes and effects, shall...
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