Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone (Google eBook)

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Penguin, Feb 2, 2012 - Social Science - 288 pages
46 Reviews
With eye-opening statistics, original data, and vivid portraits of people who live alone, renowned sociologist Eric Klinenberg upends conventional wisdom to deliver the definitive take on how the rise of going solo is transforming the American experience.
            Klinenberg shows that most single dwellers—whether in their twenties or eighties—are deeply engaged in social and civic life. There's even evidence that people who live alone enjoy better mental health and have more environmentally sustainable lifestyles. Drawing on more than three hundred in-depth interviews, Klinenberg presents a revelatory examination of the most significant demographic shift since the baby boom and offers surprising insights on the benefits of this epochal change.

  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - areadingmachine - LibraryThing

A biography about the second half of Roald Dahls life that covers his time in the airforce as he flies against the Germans in WW2. Very moving and human Roald really invites us in to his life. What he ... Read full review

Review: Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone

User Review  - Emily Carlin - Goodreads

This was a bit underwhelming, but I guess I am happy to have read it. Klinenberg seemed unwilling to just say things -- everything was qualified or tentative. Which is fine (and good in that it ... Read full review

Contents

THE SINGLETON SOCIETY
GOING SOLO
THE CAPACITY TO LIVE ALONE
SEPARATING
PROTECTING THE SELF
TOGETHER ALONE
AGING ALONE
REDESIGNING SOLO LIFE
CONCLUSION
Methods of Research and Analysis
Select Bibliography
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Eric Klinenberg is a professor of sociology at New York University and the editor of the journal Public Culture. His first book, Heat Wave, won several prizes and was declared a "Favorite Book" by the Chicago Tribune. He lives in New York City.

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