Consumer Culture and Postmodernism (Google eBook)

Front Cover
SAGE, Jul 11, 2007 - Social Science - 232 pages
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‘It is great to see the re-publication of the classic Consumer Culture and Postmodernism. The extensive new material is erudite, informative and important, particularly locating consumer culture in the context of global climate change and postmodernism within a framing that seriously displaces the 'west' from centre-stage' - John Urry, Lancaster University

The first edition of this contemporary classic can claim to have put 'consumer culture' on the map, certainly in relation to postmodernism. This expanded new edition includes:

- A fully revised preface that explores the developments in consumer culture since the first edition

- A major new chapter on 'Modernity and the Cultural Question'

- An update on postmodernism and the development of contemporary theory after postmodernism

- An account of multiple and alternative modernities

- The challenges of consumer culture in Japan and China

The result is a book that shakes the boundaries of debate, from one of the foremost writers on culture and postmodernism of the present day.

  

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Contents

Definitions and Interpretations
1
2 Theories of Consumer Culture
13
3 Towards a Sociology of Postmodern Culture
28
4 Cultural Change and Social Practice
50
5 The Aestheticization of Everyday Life
64
6 Lifestyle and Consumer Culture
81
7 City Cultures and Postmodern Lifestyles
93
8 Consumer Culture and Global Disorder
110
9 Common Culture or Uncommon Cultures?
127
10 The Globalization of Diversity
142
11 Modernity and the Cultural Question
147
Bibliography
182
Index
198
Copyright

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Page 7 - ... a prodigious expansion of culture throughout the social realm, to the point at which everything in our social life - from economic value and state power to practices and to the very structure of the psyche itself - can be said to have become 'cultural' in some original and as yet untheorized sense.
Page 18 - culture industry' is a targeted rather than an undifferentiated field, and lifestyle practices reflect the divisions of class and culture: . . . knowledge becomes important: knowledge of new goods, their social and cultural value, and how to use them appropriately. This is particularly the case with aspiring groups who adopt a learning mode towards consumption and the cultivation of a lifestyle. It is for groups such as the new middle class, the new working class and the new rich or upper class,...

References to this book

Banal Nationalism
Michael Billig
Limited preview - 1995
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About the author (2007)

Mike Featherstone is Professor of Communications and Sociology at Nottingham Trent University.

CONTRIBUTORS OUTSIDE NORTH AMERICA :

Zygmunt Bauman University of Leeds

Henning Bech University of Copenhagen

Elizabeth Beck-Gernsheim Universtiy of Erlangen

Mary Evans University of Kent at Canterbury

David Frisby University of Glasgow

Mike Hepworth University of Aberdeen

Eva Illouz Tel-Aviv University

Maria Esther Maciel Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais

Michael Richardson SOAS, University of London

Laura Rival University of Kent at Canterbury

Andrew Travers Somerset

Jeffrey Weeks South Bank University

Sasha Weitman Tel-Aviv University

Sam Whimster London Guildhall University

Elizabeth Wilson University of North London

Cas Wouters University of Utrecht

Bibliographic information