Economics of Environmental Conservation (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Clement Allan Tisdell
Edward Elgar Publishing, Jan 1, 2005 - Business & Economics - 288 pages
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Tisdell has produced one of the best books in print about the economics of environmental conservation. This volume updates the 1991 edition by discussing more current issues, theories, developments, and analytic frameworks. Tisdell masterfully weaves into many chapters insights from ecological economics a somewhat new area of economics that cannot be ignored in informed discussions of environmental conservation. . . Tisdell writes clearly and documents each chapter extremely well. He presents a quite balanced view on policy issues, discussing pros and cons of different policies. . . Overall, an extraordinary book. Essential. Academic collections, upper-division undergraduate and up. D.D. Miller, Choice I like it alot and would certainly recommend it to students as an excellent entry point into environmental economics. It is certainly comprehensive, covering international through to local environmental issues, developed and developing country experiences across both green and brown topics. The book is written in a highly accessible style and embodies a rigorous theoretical base on which is developed a host of practical examples of application. This reflects Tisdell s wide ranging experience as one of the senior statesmen of environmental economics. Jeff Bennett, The Australian National University A second edition of this book is to be warmly welcomed. The insights it offers into the sustainable use of ecological resources, especially in developing countries, are important for those coming to the study of environmental, resource or ecological economics for the first time. While the treatment of new topics such as globalization and the Environmental Kuznets Curve adds value to the original text, the inclusion of much material from the first edition helps remind us that there is a rich and long-standing literature on this topic. Charles Perrings, University of York, UK In the second edition of Economics of Environmental Conservation Clem Tisdell applies wisdom, experience and carefully developed economic theory to dozens of conservation issues. The result is a wide ranging book that skillfully employs ecological economics to analyse conservation issues drawn often from Australia and Asia and relevant in many countries. The policy options proposed to the diverse conservation issues reflect a philosophy developed during more than thirty years research. The book is a rich source of insight and inspiration for anyone analysing environmental conservation issues. Ross Cullen, Lincoln University, New Zealand Few economists have the breadth of experience and depth of analytical capability to comment with insight on the vast array of issues that now comprise the environmental agenda. Clem Tisdell is one of that small band. Here is a welcome expansion of his already successful Economics of Environmental Conservation. Highly recommended. David Pearce, University College London, UK This fully updated and comprehensively revised edition of a classic text concentrates on the economics of conserving the living environment. It begins by covering the ethical foundations and basic economic paradigms essential for understanding and assessing ecological economics. General strategies for global environmental conservation, policies for government intervention, developing countries, preserving wildlife and biodiversity, open-access to and common property in natural resources, conservation of natural areas, forestry, agriculture and the environment, tourism, sustainable development and demographic change are also all covered. This second edition deals with contemporary environmental policy issues that can be expected to be of lasting concern and importance each chapter benefiting from either the addition of substantial sections of new material, valuable explanations or updates and revisions in light of developments in theory or world events and conditions. Updated techniques of economic analysis are also introduced, explained simply, and a
  

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Contents

Economics and the living environment
1
12 WELFARE ECONOMICS ENVIRONMENT AND THE BIOSPHERE
2
ALTERNATIVE VIEWS
7
DIFFERING VIEWS
12
15 UNCERTAINTY WELFARE AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES
19
16 CONCLUSION
20
Global conservation strategies and concerns
25
22 A CLASSIFICATION OF CONSERVATION POLICIES
26
72 BENEFITS AND USES OF NATURAL PROTECTED AREAS
155
73 AN OVERVIEW OF APPROACHES TO ESTIMATING THE ECONOMIC VALUE OF NONMARKETED COMMODITIES
156
74 TRAVEL COST METHOD OF ESTIMATING THE VALUE OF A NATURAL AREA
158
75 CONTINGENT VALUATION OF NATURAL AREAS
163
76 HEDONIC PRICE VALUATION OF NATURAL AREAS
167
77 SOME ADDITIONAL ECONOMIC VALUATION TECHNIQUES
169
79 BACK TO SOME FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMIC VALUATION
171
710 GOVERNMENT VERSUS NONGOVERNMENT PROVISION OF NATURAL AREAS
173

ORIGINS AIMS AND BASIC PRINCIPLES
30
AGRICULTURE FORESTS MARINE AND FRESHWATER SYSTEMS
33
25 PRESERVATION OF GENETIC DIVERSITY
38
26 SUSTAINABLE UTILISATION OF SPECIES AND ECOSYSTEMS
41
27 SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES BETWEEN CARING FOR THE EARTH AND THE WORLD CONSERVATION STRATEGY
44
28 INTERNATIONAL CONSERVATION CONCERNS AND PRIORITIES
47
29 CONCLUDING COMMENTS
49
Markets and government intervention in environmental conservation
52
32 MARKET EFFICIENCY AND EXTERNALITIES
56
33 GOVERNMENT POLICIES TO CORRECT FOR EXTERNALITIES
65
34 PUBLIC OR COLLECTIVE GOOD CHARACTERISTICS ASSOCIATED WITH THE CONSERVATION OF NATURE
70
35 OPTION DEMANDS TRANSACTION COSTS MORE ON EXISTENCE VALUES BEQUEST IRREVERSIBILITY AND UNCERTAINTY
73
36 DISCOUNT RATES AS GROUNDS FOR GOVERNMENT INTERVENTION
75
37 MONOPOLIES AND CONSERVATION
76
38 COMMONPROPERTY AND INTERVENTION
78
39 FAILURE OF POLITICAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE MECHANISMS IN RELATION TO CONSERVATION
79
310 CONCLUDING COMMENT
81
Environmental conservation in developing countries
84
ORIGIN
85
43 POPULATION GROWTH AND INCOME ASPIRATIONS
86
44 EXPANSION OF THE MARKET SYSTEM
88
45 NEW TECHNOLOGY
89
46 PROBLEMS ILLUSTRATED BY SOME CASES
90
47 HIGH EFFECTIVE RATES OF DISCOUNT
93
48 DIFFICULTIES IN ENFORCING CONSERVATION MEASURES AND QUESTIONS OF SOCIAL STRUCTURE
94
49 POLICIES FOR INFLUENCING AND IMPROVING CONSERVATION PRACTICES IN THE THIRD WORLD
95
410 PROVISION OF INFORMATION AND EDUCATION
96
412 TOURISM AS A MEANS OF APPROPRIATING GAINS FROM CONSERVATION
98
413 IMPROVING THE DISTRIBUTION OF GAINS FROM CONSERVATION WITHIN LDCS
99
414 INTERNATIONAL AID AND ASSISTANCE LOANS AND TRADE
101
415 GLOBAL PUBLIC GOODEXTERNALITY CONSIDERATIONS
103
416 CONCLUDING OBSERVATIONS ON CONSERVATION IN LDCS
105
Preservation of wildlife and genetic diversity
109
52 TOTAL ECONOMIC VALUE AND THE VALUATION OF WILDLIFE AND BIODIVERSITY
110
SIMPLE ANALYTICS
113
54 SOME ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES OF INTERDEPENDENCE BETWEEN SPECIES
118
55 CRITERIA FOR DECIDING ON SPECIES TO SAVE FROM EXTINCTION
121
56 PROPERTY RIGHTS IN GENETIC MATERIAL GMOS AND THE CONSERVATION OF BIODIVERSITY
126
57 GLOBALISATION MARKET EXTENSION AND GENETIC DIVERSITY OF DOMESTICATED ANIMALS AND PLANTS
128
58 CONCLUDING COMMENTS
129
Openaccess commonproperty and natural resource management
132
ECONOMIC FAILURES AND THEIR CONSEQUENCES
135
63 POLICIES FOR MANAGING OPENACCESS RESOURCES
140
64 FURTHER DISCUSSION OF FEATURES OF OPENACCESS TO RESOURCES AND ITS REGULATION
143
65 RANCHING AND FARMING AS MEANS TO OVERCOME OPENACCESS PROBLEMS AND CONSERVE SPECIES
146
66 CONCLUDING COMMENT
150
Economics of conserving natural areas and valuation techniques
153
711 CONCLUDING COMMENTS
175
Forestry trees and conservation
179
82 COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR TIMBER PRODUCTION
181
83 MULTIPLE PURPOSE MANAGEMENT OF FORESTS
186
84 FORESTS AND TREES IN LESS DEVELOPED COUNTRIES
188
85 ECONOMIC POLICIES POLLUTION FORESTS AND TREES
192
A DISCUSSION
195
87 CONCLUDING REMARKS
196
Agriculture and the environment
199
92 EXTERNALITIES AND AGRICULTURE
200
922 Agricultural Spillovers on Nonagricultural Sectors and Interests
206
923 Spillovers From Other Sectors on Agriculture
207
93 SUSTAINABILITY OF AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS
208
94 THE GREEN REVOLUTION ORGANIC AGRICULTURE PERMACULTURE
211
95 PEST AND DISEASE CONTROL IN AGRICULTURE
216
96 AGRICULTURE BIODIVERSITY TREES AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION
218
ECONOMIC AND BIODIVERSITY ISSUES
220
98 CONCLUDING OBSERVATIONS
222
Tourism outdoor recreation and the natural environment
225
102 TOURISM DESTROYS TOURISM AND TOURIST ASSETS
226
1021 Congestion or Crowding and Tourism
227
1022 Destruction of Tourism Resources by Visitors
229
103 TOURISM AREA CYCLE AND MORE ON THE DYNAMICS OF TOURISM
231
104 IMPACT OF POLLUTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL DAMAGE ON TOURISM AND BENEFITS FROM POLLUTION CONTROL
234
105 TOURISM CONSERVATION AND THE TOTAL ECONOMIC VALUE OF A NATURAL AREA AND ECONOMIC IMPACT ANALYSIS
237
106 SUSTAINABILITY ECOTOURISM AND ECONOMICS
239
107 CONFLICTS BETWEEN TOURISTS VARIETY IN TOURIST AREAS PUBLIC FINANCE ISSUES AND NATIONAL GAINS
240
108 CONCLUDING OBSERVATIONS
241
11 Sustainable development and conservation
243
112 SUSTAINING INTERGENERATIONAL ECONOMIC WELFARE
244
FURTHER CONSIDERATIONS
248
114 SURVIVAL OF THE HUMAN SPECIES FOR AS LONG AS POSSIBLE
251
115 ISSUES RAISED BY THE VIEWS OF DALY AND GEORGESCUROEGEN ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY
253
116 RESILIENCE OF PRODUCTION AND ECONOMIC SYSTEMS AND STATIONARITY OF THEIR ATTRIBUTES
256
117 COSTBENEFIT ANALYSIS AND SUSTAINABILITY
258
118 SUSTAINABILITY OF COMMUNITY
260
119 SUSTAINING BIODIVERSITY
261
1110 CONCLUDING REMARKS
263
Population economic growth globalisation and conservation a concluding perspective
267
CHARACTERISTICS AND PROJECTIONS
268
123 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF POPULATION GROWTH AND ECONOMIC DEMANDS
269
DO THEY PROVIDE GROUNDS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL OPTIMISM?
270
125 IS ECONOMIC GLOBALISATION FAVOURABLE OR UNFAVOURABLE TO ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION?
273
126 CONCLUDING OBSERVATIONS
274
Index
277
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About the author (2005)

Lynn Welchman is Director of the Centre of Islamic and Middle Eastern Law at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London.

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