A narrative of Andersonville, drawn from the evidence elicited on the trial of H. Wirz (Google eBook)

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1866
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Page 262 - Thou shalt not smite them: wouldest thou smite those whom thou hast taken captive with thy sword and with thy bow? set bread and water before them, that they may eat and drink, and go to their master.
Page 276 - MOTLEY'S UNITED NETHERLANDS. History of the United Netherlands : from the Death of William the Silent to the Twelve Years
Page 233 - On the contrary, if war be actually levied, that is, if a body of men be actually assembled for the purpose of effecting by force a treasonable purpose, all those who perform any part, however minute, or however remote from the scene of action, and who are actually leagued in the general conspiracy, are to be considered as traitors.
Page 169 - ... no person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on presentment or indictment of a grand jury.
Page 170 - It rests upon axioms as simple as they are universal ; the means ought to be proportioned to the end ; the persons, from whose agency the attainment of any end is expected, ought to possess the means by which it is to be attained.
Page 181 - The government which has a right to do an act, and has imposed on it the duty of performing that act, must, according to the dictates of reason, be allowed to select the means ; and those who contend that it may not select any appropriate means, that one particular mode of effecting the object is excepted, take upon themselves the burden of establishing that exception.
Page 169 - These powers ought to exist without limitation, because it is impossible to foresee or define the extent and variety of national exigencies, or the correspondent extent and variety of the means which may be necessary to satisfy them. The circumstances that endanger the safety of nations are infinite, and for this reason no constitutional shackles can wisely be imposed on the power to which the care of it is committed.
Page 170 - In the authority given to Congress by the Constitution of the United States to declare war, all the powers incident to war are by necessary implication conferred upon the government of the United States.
Page 147 - Stevenson, and others unknown, to injure the health and destroy the lives of soldiers in the military service of the United States, then held and being prisoners of war within the lines of the so-called Confederate States and in the military prisons thereof, to the end that the armies of the United States might be weakened and impaired, in violation of the laws and customs of war.
Page 277 - ... work is an important one, the result of profound research, sincere convictions, sound principles, and manly sentiments; and even those who are most familiar with the history of the period will find in it a fresh and vivid addition to their previous knowledge. It does honor to American literature, and would do honor to the literature of any country in the world. Edinburgh Review.

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