History of the Epidemic Yellow Fever: At New Orleans, La., in 1853 (Google eBook)

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Hall, Clayton, 1854 - Yellow fever - 84 pages
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Page 81 - of soldiers lately arrived in the West Indies any number; place them in barracks in a low wet situation, or in the mouth of a gully, or on the brink of a dry river, or on the summit of a mountain, and to leeward of a swamp, or of uncleared ground, and where there is no water or only bad water; give them each only twenty-two inches of wall in their...
Page 72 - We have shown that no vessel that arrived here from any infected port, whether in South America or the West Indies, brought any cases of Yellow Fever, had any on them whilst they were here, or gave rise to any cases previous to those which must have originated in this city. 4. That within a very few days after the occurrence of the first cases, others were seen in different and remote places, having no sort of connection or intercommunication that we were able to trace after a careful inquiry.
Page 56 - And yet this type of fever in the city negro must be produced by the very same cause that gives rise to malignant Yellow Fever in the white race. Occasionally we see the hemorrhagic diathesis of Yellow Fever displayed in the negro, but it is by no means common. The least mixture of the white race with the black seems to increase the liability of the latter to the dangers of Yellow Fever ; and the danger is in proportion to the amount of white blood in the mixture.
Page 75 - I have now admitted, for the sake of argument, all that is contended for by the most strenuous advocates of contagion, and what does it amount to ? — that Yellow Fever may be conveyed from place to place, in ships, goods and persons; and even be communicated to those who come in contact, yet this effect is so seldom produced as to make but a rare exception to the general rule. Now, does this afford sufficient inducement for the establishment of Quarantine, involving heavy expense, and throwing...
Page 49 - It was shown that it also broke out in various other places quite remote from each 40 •other, and having no special or marked intercommunication. It is worthy of particular notice that the Epidemic prevailed in the unpaved, and, of course, least improved parts of the city all around, long before it did in the central and best improved parts. It is well known • that the Epidemic was not so bad this year on Chartres, Royal, Burgundy, Customhouse, Bienville, Conti, and St. Louis streets, as it was...
Page 83 - Epidemics do not spread from district to district by any rule of gradual progression, but often ravage certain localities, while they spare entirely, or visit very lightly, others in the immediate neighborhood, with which the inhabitants are in constant intercommunication. " 5. That Yellow Fever Epidemics, when they invade a district, do not spread from the houses first infected to the next, and thence to the adjoining, and thus extend as from a centre: but, on the contrary, are often confined to...
Page 75 - It is equally applicable tofomites of all kinds. I have now admitted, for the sake of argument, all that is contended for by the most strenuous advocates of contagion, and what does it amount to ? — that Yellow Fever may be conveyed from place to place, in ships, goods and persons ; and even be communicated to those who come in contact, yet this effect is so seldom produced as to make but a rare exception to the general rule. Now, does this afford sufficient inducement for the establishment of...
Page 50 - ... the mucous membrane after death pale and softened. Hence we may explain a fact that has been observed by many, viz: that recovery is more apt to take place after free discharges of black vomit than after very slight. The reason is obvious: in one instance, nature effectually relieves the distressed organ by directly depleting its morbidly engorged blood-vessels ; whilst in the other there is not a sufficient discharge to afford any relief.
Page 77 - I have the right to comment respectfully upon the conduct of all our public servantsr and I do so when I think it proper. The celebrated Dr. Rush, of Philadelphia, a revolutionary patriot, and one of the greatest ornaments of the medical profession, maintained that " city authorities were justly chargeable with the lives of all who die of preventable diseases within their jurisdiction, and that they should be made responsible for the same before the courts of justice.
Page 54 - Rushton says he had two cases to recover from black vomit. Dr. Choppin, House Surgeon of the Charity Hospital, gives it as his opinion that seven per cent, of the cases of black vomit in that institution recovered. • Notwithstanding all this testimony to the fact of recovery from black vomit, one of the most prominent physicians of the city, who has practiced here near twenty years, tells me he never knew a case of unquestionable black vomit in Yellow Fever get well.

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