Biographical Memoirs, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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National Academy of Sciences, 1895 - Scientists
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List of papers contained in v. 1-9 is given in National Academy of Sciences. Proceedings ... Index ... 1915-24, 1926.
  

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Page 118 - It is easy to speculate on the causes of such behavior, and it may be suggested that the reason of the non-appearance of a dark line may be that the intensity of the light from a great thickness of ignited oxygen overpowers the effect of the photosphere...
Page 250 - Contributions to Meteorology : being Results derived from an examination of the Observations of the United States Signal Service, and from other sources.
Page 245 - Loomis's Elements of Analytical Geometry, and of the Differential and Integral Calculus.
Page 409 - Notes explanatory of a map and section, illustrating the geological structure of the country bordering on the Missouri river, from the mouth of the Platte to Fort Benton in latitude 47 30' N., longitude 110 30
Page 109 - ... photographs. The investigation was thereupon extended by Professor Pickering and divided into three parts. The first included a general survey of stellar spectra, each spectrum being photographed with an exposure of not less than five minutes. These photographs generally exhibited the spectra of all stars brighter than the sixth magnitude with sufficient distinctness for measurement. The second research related to a determination of the spectra of the fainter stars. Each photograph...
Page 225 - ... been constructed, but it was used for instruction, not for original work. At Washington Lieutenant Gilliss, and at Dorchester Mr. Bond, were commissioned by the government in 1838 to observe moon culminations in correspondence with the observers in the Wilkes exploring expedition for determining their longitude. These two prospective sets of observations, both of them under government auspices and pay, were the only signs of systematic astronomical activity in the United States outside of Hudson,...
Page 105 - ... photographed. The subject of planetary spectra will be reserved for a future communication. A preliminary examination at once shows that these stellar spectra are divisible into two groups : first, those closely resembling the solar spectrum ; and second, those in which there are relatively but few lines, and these of great breadth and intensity. The photographs of the spectra of Arcturus and Capella are so similar to the solar spectrum, that I have not up to the present detected any material...
Page 6 - Rogers' geological work was to show that the condition of any coal-bed stands in a close genetic relation to the amount of disturbance to which the enclosing strata have been submitted, the coal becoming harder and containing less volatile matter as the evidence of disturbance increases. This generalization, which seems to us now almost self-evident understanding, as we do, more of the history of the formation of coal wae with Prof.
Page 424 - I cannot forbear suggesting : we have long known that "one star differeth from another star in glory;" we have now the strongest evidence that they also differ in constituent materials, some of them perhaps having no elements to be found in some other. What then becomes of that homogeneity of original diffuse matter which is almost a logical necessity of the nebular hypothesis...
Page 224 - Greenwich though obtained from a small number of observations, differs less than two seconds of time from our best determinations to-day. While in Europe in 1836-37 Professor Loomis, as I have said, bought for Western Reserve College the instruments for an observatory. These were a four-inch equatorial, a transit instrument and an astronomical clock. On his return he erected, in 1837, a small observatory at Hudson, and in September, 1838, began to use the instruments. He had no assistant, and by...

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