Fifth Reader (Google eBook)

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Silver, Burdett, 1892 - Readers - 511 pages
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Contents

Description of a ThunderStorm Washington Irving
46
A Wanderer on the Deep Mrs Felicia Hemans
48
Mountains William Howitt
49
The Music of Nature
50
Rain upon the Roof Coates Kinney
53
Rain Caroline Southey
54
Sayings of Ruskin
55
The Prairies William Cullen Bryant
57
Nature Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
60
March William Wordsworth
62
The Summer Months William Motherwell
63
The Death of the Flowers William Cullen Bryant
65
It Snows Mrs S J Hale
67
FrostWork
69
The Fringed Gentian
72
To the Fringed Gentian William Cullen Bryant
74
The Daffodils William Wordsworth
75
Tis the Last Rose of Summer Thomas Moore
76
From the Twentyfourth Psalm
77
PAM 1 Bees in the Hive Miss Betta A Hoyles
79
A BeeHunt Washington Irving
88
The Mind of the Spider Cad L Washburn
91
Humanity William Cowper
99
The Sagacity of the Spider Oliver Goldsmith
100
The Battle of the Ants Henry D Thoreau
103
The Nightingale S H Peabody
107
The Nightingale and the Glowworm William Cowper
110
The Bobolink Washington Irving
111
Lines to a Waterfowl William Cullen Bryant
116
The Bluebird Emily H Miller
117
The Winged Worshippers Charles Sprague
118
The Web of Life
119
Man and the Inferior Animals Jane Taylor
120
PART III
123
The Fate of the Indians Charles Sprague
129
The Indian Alexander Pope
131
The Thirteen Colonies t W Higginson
132
Tea Parties in Old Times Washington Irving
134
An Appeal to Arms Patrick Henry
138
Who was He? George W Curtis
142
The Revolutionary Alarm George Bancroft
143
Warrens Address joan Pierpont
145
George Washington Aaron Bancroft
146
The Character of Washington George W Curtis
148
Address to the American Army George Washington
151
The Declaration of Independence Robert C Winthrop
153
Duties of American Citizens Daniel Webster
157
The Constitution William Cullen Bryant
159
The Constitution William Cullen Bryant
160
No Place like Home John Howard Payne
161
The Fruits of Liberty Thomas B Macaulay
162
The Antiquity of Freedom William Cullen Bryant
163
The Necessity of Government John C Calhoun
167
The Pilgrim Fathers John Boyle OReilly
168
Serenade James G Percival
196
John Maynard John B Gough
200
The Will and the Way John G Saxe
202
Little Nicholas and how he became a Great Musician J G Flint
203
A Glorious Name William Cullen Bryant
208
The Light of Other Days Thomas Moore
209
Translation of the Twentythird Psalm Joseph Addison
210
True Rest John S Dwight
211
The Long Ago B F Taylor
212
The Meeting of the Waters Thomas Moore
214
Look Aloft Jonathan Lawrence
215
The Study of Words Retta A Hoyles 21ti 19 What is Time? William Marsden
220
Time Thomas Carlyle
221
Imaginary Evils Charles Swain
222
The Venomous Worm J Russell
223
Wine is a Mocker Solomon
224
The Bridal WineCup
225
Desolating Effects of Intemperance Washington Irving
229
Eulogy on Cold Water Paul Denton
231
The Folly of Intoxication William Shakespeare
233
Profaneness E H Chapin
236
The Perfect Life Ben Jonson
237
The ColdWater Man John G Saxe
238
The Three Black Crows John Byrom
240
The Philosophers Scales Jane Taylor
242
A Good Name William Shakespeare
245
The NovelReader
246
The Burial of Moses Mrs Alexander
256
Washington Irving 209
269
William Cullen Bryant
289
Henry Wadswortii Longfellow 209
305
The FlowerdeLuce Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
311
Walter Von der Vogelweid 317
317
The Two Angels 320
325
Oliver Wendell Holmes
327
The Living Temple Oliver Wendell Holmes
335
The Last Leaf
342
Alfred Tennyson
345
The Poets Song Alfred Tennyson
349
Sweet and Low
355
The Brook
364
Quotations from Tennyson
377
Charles Dickens
379
William Shakespeare
411
PART VI
447
The Burial of Moses Mrs Alexander
450
Patrick Henry
453
Charles Sprague
459
Aaron Bancroft
463
Alexander Mrs 250
464
Thomas Starr King
469
Bailey P John 245
470
Vocabularies
485
Copyright

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Page 235 - It is not growing like a tree In bulk, doth make Man better be ; Or standing long an oak, three hundred year, To fall a log at last, dry, bald, and sere : A lily of a day Is fairer far in May, Although it fall and die that night It was the plant and flower of Light. In small proportions we just beauties see ; And in short measures life may perfect be.
Page 75 - I WANDERED lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host of golden daffodils, Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the Milky Way, They stretched in never-ending line Along the margin of a bay: Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.
Page 176 - Liberty first and Union afterwards ; but everywhere, spread all over in characters of living light, blazing on all its ample folds, as they float over the sea and over the land, and in every wind under the whole heavens, that other sentiment, dear to every true American heart, Liberty and Union, Now and Forever, One and Inseparable.
Page 266 - THE EPITAPH. Here rests his head upon the lap of Earth A youth to Fortune and to Fame unknown ; Fair Science frowned not on his humble birth, And Melancholy marked him for her own. Large was his bounty, and his soul sincere, Heaven did a recompense as largely send ; He gave to Misery all he had, a tear, He gained from Heaven ('t was all he wished) a friend.
Page 139 - And what have we to oppose to them ? Shall we try argument? Sir, we have been trying that for the last ten years. Have we anything new to offer upon the subject? Nothing. We have held the subject up in every light of which it is capable ; but it has been all in vain.
Page 265 - E'en from the tomb the voice of Nature cries, E'en in our ashes live their wonted fires. For thee, who, mindful of the unhonored dead, Dost in these lines their artless tale relate; If chance, by lonely Contemplation led, Some kindred spirit shall inquire thy fate...
Page 266 - OF all the thoughts of God that are Borne inward unto souls afar, Along the Psalmist's music deep, Now tell me if that any is, For gift or grace, surpassing this ' He giveth His beloved sleep ' ? What would we give to our beloved?
Page 438 - The crow doth sing as sweetly as the lark When neither is attended, and I think The nightingale, if she should sing by day, When every goose is cackling, would be thought No better a musician than the wren.
Page 417 - Signior Antonio, many a time and oft, In the Rialto you have rated me, About my moneys, and my usances : Still have I borne it with a patient shrug : For sufferance is the badge of all our tribe...
Page 117 - All day thy wings have fanned, At that far height, the cold thin atmosphere, Yet stoop not, weary, to the welcome land, Though the dark night is near. And soon that toil shall end; Soon shalt thou find a summer home, and rest, And scream among thy fellows ; reeds shall bend, Soon, o'er thy sheltered nest.

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