Damia

Front Cover
Corgi Books, 1993 - Science fiction - 384 pages
16 Reviews
Of all the Rowan's children, Damia was the most brilliant, the most difficult, the loneliest, and the one who had inherited the greatest Talent. It was obvious from childhood that she was going to be a Prime, with all the honours, burdens and strains of that elite class. Her one friend was Afra - Older, wiser, Talented in his own way, but 'belonging' almost exclusively to the Rowan and the workings of Callisto Station. As Damia grew up, her Talent became almost too strong to control, and the solution was separation - from her parents, from Callisto, from her beloved Afra. Sent to the distant planet of Deneb, to her strange and gifted grandmother, Damia began the training necessary to turn her into a Prime of extraordinary gifts - a Prime who could contact the minds of approaching aliens through space, some of whom threatened to totally destroy the worlds of the Nine Star League.

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Review: Damia (The Tower and the Hive #2)

User Review  - Emily Taylor - Goodreads

This remains one of my favorite books, even if only for the developing love story between Damia and Afra. It deinitely loses some of the sexism of Rowan, but still remains, at its core, a space romance. Read full review

Review: Damia (The Tower and the Hive #2)

User Review  - Julie Sondra Decker - Goodreads

Damia, daughter of Jeff Raven and the Rowan, was a difficult child, now a talented adult expected to follow in her parents' footsteps. Like her mother, she is very lonely once she's assigned to her ... Read full review

About the author (1993)

Anne McCaffrey was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts on April 1, 1926. She received a degree in Slavonic languages from Radcliffe College. She worked in advertising for Helena Rubenstein from 1947 to 1952. Her first publication was a short story in Science Fiction Magazine, and her first novel, Restoree, was published in 1967. She is a well-known author of over 100 books, mostly science fiction, including the Dragonriders of Pern series, the Crystal Singer series, Acorna's Children series, The Twins of Petaybee series, and Barque Cats series. She won numerous awards including the Hugo Award for Best Novella for the short story Weyr Search in 1968 and the Nebula Award for Best Novella for Dragonrider in 1969. In 2006, she was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame. She has also written books under the pseudonym Jody Lynn. She died of a stroke on November 21, 2011 at the age of 85.

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