The Internet Challenge to Television

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Harvard University Press, Jun 1, 2009 - Computers - 384 pages
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After a half-century of glacial creep, television technology has begun to change at the same dizzying pace as computer software. What this will mean--for television, for computers, and for the popular culture where these video media reign supreme--is the subject of this timely book. A noted communications economist, Bruce Owen supplies the essential background: a grasp of the economic history of the television industry and of the effects of technology and government regulation on its organization. He also explores recent developments associated with the growth of the Internet. With this history as a basis, his book allows readers to peer into the future--at the likely effects of television and the Internet on each other, for instance, and at the possibility of a convergence of the TV set, computer, and telephone.

The digital world that Owen shows us is one in which communication titans jockey to survive what Joseph Schumpeter called the "gales of creative destruction." While the rest of us simply struggle to follow the new moves, believing that technology will settle the outcome, Owen warns us that this is a game in which Washington regulators and media hyperbole figure as broadly as innovation and investment. His book explains the game as one involving interactions among all the players, including consumers and advertisers, each with a particular goal. And he discusses the economic principles that govern this game and that can serve as powerful predictive tools.

  

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Contents

Part One The Basics
1
1 Television the Internet and Consumer Demand
3
2 Successful Media Technologies
15
Part Two The Analog Communication World
43
3 Nonelectronic Media
45
4 The Evolution of Broadcast Radio
52
5 The Tragedy of Broadcast Regulation
79
6 The Evolution of Broadcast Television
90
A Cautionary Tale
235
Part Four Future Digital Media
243
13 DirecttoHome Digital Broadcast Satellites
245
14 Wireless Cable
270
15 Digital Television
283
16 Television by Mail
295
17 Video on the Web
311
Conclusion
327

7 The Evolution of Cable Television
107
8 Early Direct Broadcast Satellites
138
Part Three The Digital Communication World
149
9 Understanding Digital Media
151
10 Networks and Pipelines
172
11 The Internet
197
Appendix
335
Glossary
341
References
352
Index
366
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Owen is the president of Economists Incorporated.

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