Einstein's Cosmos: How Albert Einstein's Vision Transformed Our Understanding of Space and Time

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W. W. Norton & Company, 2004 - Science - 251 pages
73 Reviews
How did Albert Einstein come up with the theories that changed the way we look at the world? By thinking in pictures. Michio Kaku leading theoretical physicist (a cofounder of string theory) and best-selling science storyteller shows how Einstein used seemingly simple images to lead a revolution in science. Daydreaming about racing a beam of light led to the special theory of relativity and the equation E = mc . Thinking about a man falling led to the general theory of relativity giving us black holes and the Big Bang. Einstein's failure to come up with a theory that would unify relativity and quantum mechanics stemmed from his lacking an apt image. Even in failure, however, Einstein's late insights have led to new avenues of research as well as to the revitalization of the quest for a "Theory of Everything." With originality and expertise, Kaku uncovers the surprising beauty that lies at the heart of Einstein's cosmos."
  

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Michio Kaku is an excellent writer. - Goodreads
A wonderful insight into Einstein. - Goodreads
His prose is still full of self-aggrandizement. - Goodreads

Review: Einstein's Cosmos: How Albert Einstein's Vision Transformed Our Understanding of Space and Time

User Review  - Ray Campbell - Goodreads

This was a biography infused will illustrations of concepts in modern Physics. Einstein's story is interesting and reasonably well known. I found that I knew or had heard most of the material of this ... Read full review

Review: Einstein's Cosmos: How Albert Einstein's Vision Transformed Our Understanding of Space and Time

User Review  - Mike Wigal - Goodreads

A light read. Interesting review of Einstein's life. Still can figure out how to build that Flux Capacitor. Read full review

Contents

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11
II
17
III
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IV
21
V
33
VI
59
VII
89
VIII
91
X
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XI
145
XII
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XIII
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XV
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XVI
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Copyright

IX
113

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About the author (2004)

Michio Kaku was born January 24, 1947 in San Jose California. Kaku attended Cubberley High School in Palo Alto in the early 1960s and played first board on their chess team. At the National Science Fair in Albuquerque, New Mexico, he attracted the attention of physicist Edward Teller, who took Kaku as a protégé, awarding him the Hertz Engineering Scholarship. Kaku graduated summa cum laude from Harvard University with a B.S. degree in 1968 and was first in his physics class. He attended the Berkeley Radiation Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley and received a Ph.D. in 1972 and held a lectureship at Princeton University in 1973. During the Vietnam War, Kaku completed his U.S. Army basic training at Fort Benning, Georgia and his advanced infantry training at Fort Lewis, Washington. Kaku currently holds the Henry Semat Chair and Professorship in theoretical physics and a joint appointment at City College of New York, and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, where he has lectured for more than 30 years. He is engaged in defining the "Theory of Everything", which seeks to unify the four fundamental forces of the universe: the strong nuclear force, the weak nuclear force, gravity and electromagnetism. He was a visiting professor at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, and New York University. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society. He is listed in Who's Who in Science and Engineering, and American Men and Women of Science. He has published research articles on string theory from 1969 to 2000. In 1974, along with Prof. K. Kikkawa, he wrote the first paper on string field theory, now a major branch of string theory, which summarizes each of the five string theories into a single equation. In addition to his work on string field theory, he also authored some of the first papers on multi-loop amplitudes in string theory. Kaku is the author of several doctoral textbooks on string theory and quantum field theory and has published 170 articles in journals covering topics such as superstring theory, supergravity, supersymmetry, and hadronic physics. He is also author of the popular science books: Visions, Hyperspace, Einstein's Cosmos, Parallel Worlds, and The Future of the Mind.

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