Experiment Station Record, Volume 28 (Google eBook)

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1913 - Agricultural experiment stations
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Page 491 - Such schools should be separate, independent, compulsory day schools, supported by special taxes, carried on usually in special buildings, administered by special boards of practical men and women, taught by specially trained practical men from the vocations, and securing the closest possible cooperation between the school and the factory, the school and the farm, the school and the counting-room, or the school and the home.
Page 317 - This gazetteer is the first of a series of reports on the surface waters of California prepared by the United States Geological Survey under cooperative agreement with the State of California as represented by the State Conservation Commission; George C.
Page 557 - ... adjustment of the nozzles almost complete protection has been afforded to a number of commercial vineyards. The apple and cherry ermine moths. In Technical Bulletin No. 24 attention is called to the occurrence of these insects in the United States and to their economic importance as fruit pests. These insects were introduced in shipments of foreign nursery stock and appeared in plantations of apple and cherry seedlings. It is stated that since the insects were first detected in 1909 special...
Page 164 - The stewing meats are generally the most economical sources of edible meat at these prices, while porterhouse steaks are the most expensive. On the whole, the data clearly show that the cheaper cuts of beef are by far the most economical sources both of lean and of total edible meat, including fat and lean. It has been shown...
Page 85 - Concrete with 10 per cent of oil has 75 per cent of the strength of plain concrete at 28 days. At the age of 1 year the crushing strength of 1 : 3 mortar suffers but little with the addition of oil in amounts up to 10 per cent. (4) The toughness or resistance to impact is but slightly affected by the addition of oil in amounts up to about 10 per cent.
Page 302 - All wild geese, wild swans, brant, wild ducks, snipe, plover, woodcock, rail, wild pigeons, and all other migratory game and insectivorous birds which in their northern and southern migrations pass through or do not remain permanently the entire year within the borders of any State or Territory, shall hereafter be deemed to be within the custody and protection of the Government of the United States, and shall not be destroyed or taken contrary to...
Page 492 - All agricultural subjects must be taught by the nature-study method, which is: to see accurately; to reason correctly from what is seen ; to establish a bond of sympathy with the object or phenomenon that is studied. One cannot see accurately unless one has the object itself. If the pupil studies corn, he should have corn in his hands and he should make his own observations and draw his own conclusions; if he studies cows, he should make his observations on cows and not on what some one has said...
Page 118 - ... catalytic power, the presence of a strong catalytic power in a soil can be taken as a priori evidence that the many factors making for soil fertility would be prominent and that the soil would be a productive soil. The catalytic power is checked to some degree by carbon bisulphide, mercuric chloride, and especially by hydrocyanic acid, which in some cases practically destroys it. Heating in an autoclave under pressure of 10 atmospheres retards the catalytic power, though dry heat for one hour...
Page 164 - Not only are the foregoing statements true of meat producers and consumers as individuals, but it is highly essential to the entire beef-cattle industry, on the one hand, and the economic welfare of the beef-eating public, on the other, that a more intelligent understanding of the different cuts of meat be acquired by consumers generally.
Page 256 - ... which injure its seed in the same manner as the common bean weevil. Like that species they begin work in the garden and field and continue to breed in the stored seed, until they entirely spoil it as food for stock, and seriously impair its germinating power.

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