General View of the Agriculture and Domestic Economy of South Wales: Containing the Counties of Brecon, Caermarthen, Cardigan, Glamorgan, Pembroke, Radnor, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Sherwood, Neely & Jones, 1815 - Agriculture
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Page 391 - At length he discovered, that where the abutments are secure from the danger of giving way, arches of much less segments, and of far less altitude, than general opinion had hitherto required, are perfectly secure, and render the bridges much easier for carriages to pass over, and in every respect adapt them better to the purposes of a ready and free communication. Impressed with the importance of those rules by which he had assiduously perfected his own practice, he was in the habit of considering...
Page 350 - Carmarthenshire ; the uppermost stratum of coal here does not extend a mile in a north and south direction, and not many miles in an east and west direction, and its utmost depth is not above 50 or 60 fathoms. 5. The next stratum of coal, and those likewise beneath it, lie deeper and expand still longer and wider, and the lowest which are attended by parallel strata of iron ore, of which there are in some situations about 16 accompanied by irregular balls or lumps of iron ore, occupy the whole space...
Page 290 - ays, " the most formidable objection against our agriculture, that the defection of servants and labourers is such, that few gentlemen can keep their lands in their own hands, but rather than make nothing of them, they let them for a little to tenants who can bear to be insulted, assaulted, kicked, cuffed, and bridewelled with more patience than gentlemen are endowed with.
Page 391 - ... that he surmounted the greatest difficulties of his occupation. At length he discovered, not by reading, conversation, or any other mode of extrinsic instruction, but by dint of his own genius, matured in the school of experience, that where the abutments are secure from the danger of giving way, arches of much less segments, and of far less altitude-, than general opinion had hitherto required, are perfectly secure, and render the bridges much easier for carriages to pass over, and in every...
Page 329 - Pembrokeshire, being there only from 3 to 5 miles. This area extends from Pontypool on the east to St. Bride's Bay on the west, and forms a vast basin of limestone in which all the strata of coal and ironstone are deposited. The...
Page 537 - THE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Which may be had of the Publishers of this Volume. Report of the Committee of the Board of Agri. . id ture on the Culture and Use of Potatoes, 410. 050 Account of Experiments tried by the Board of Agriculture on the Composition of various Sorts of Bread, 410. - - - o...
Page 338 - ... to worke with, though not soe well as the other kinde of cole, called the running cole, for that, when it first kindleth, it melteth and runneth as wax, and groweth into one clodd, \\hereas this stone cole burneth aparte, and never clyngeth together.
Page 351 - By taking the average length and breadth of the foregoing different strata of coal, the amount is about 1000 square miles, containing 95 feet of coal in 23 distinct strata, which will produce in the common way of working 100,000 tons per acre, or 64,000,000 tons per square mile.
Page 347 - ... of stone he layeth it ; where meeteth him another boy with an empty basket which he giveth him, and taketh that which is full of coles, and...
Page 485 - ... of such establishments to excite. Obstacles to Improvement. Among the obstacles to improvement in this county, may be stated the local prejudices of the common farmers, and the present mode of paying tithes in kind. Should the Board of Agriculture be enabled, through its united wisdom and influence, to procure the adoption of some eligible plan for commuting the payment of tithes ; I do not know of any one measure, that would be...

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