Operating Systems: Internals and Design Principles

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Prentice Hall, 2008 - Computers - 822 pages
16 Reviews

For a one-semester undergraduate course in operating systems for computer science, computer engineering, and electrical engineering majors.

Winner of the 2009 Textbook Excellence Award from the Text and Academic Authors Association (TAA)!

Operating Systems: Internals and Design Principles is a comprehensive and unified introduction to operating systems. By using several innovative tools, Stallings makes it possible to understand critical core concepts that can be fundamentally challenging. The new edition includes the implementation of web based animations to aid visual learners. At key points in the book, students are directed to view an animation and then are provided with assignments to alter the animation input and analyze the results.

The concepts are then enhanced and supported by end-of-chapter case studies of UNIX, Linux and Windows Vista. These provide students with a solid understanding of the key mechanisms of modern operating systems and the types of design tradeoffs and decisions involved in OS design. Because they are embedded into the text as end of chapter material, students are able to apply them right at the point of discussion. This approach is equally useful as a basic reference and as an up-to-date survey of the state of the art.

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A great book for those who want the most knowledge about operating system .
this book first gives a brief introduction for hardware and then rest is about operating systems design , working and
everything . Great book in life Thanks to the author for writing such a Great book . I would rate this book as 4.5 / 5  

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Introduction to Operating Systems class Read full review

Contents

CHAPTER
8
Interrupts and the Instruction Cycle
20
Operating System Overview
50
Copyright

23 other sections not shown

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About the author (2008)

††††William Stallings has made a unique contribution to understanding the broad sweep of technical developments in computer networking and computer architecture. He has authored 17 titles, and counting revised editions, a total of 41 books on various aspects of these subjects. In over 20 years in the field, he has been a technical contributor, technical manager, and an executive with several high-technology firms. Currently he is an independent consultant whose clients have included computer and networking manufacturers and customers, software development firms, and leading-edge government research institutions.

†††††††† He has seven times received the award for the best Computer Science textbook of the year from the Text and Academic Authors Association.

†††††††† Bill has designed and implemented both TCP/IP-based and OSI-based protocol suites on a variety of computers and operating systems, ranging from microcomputers to mainframes. As a consultant, he has advised government agencies, computer and software vendors, and major users on the design, selection, and use of networking software and products.

†††††††† As evidence of his commitment to providing a broad range of support to students, Bill created and maintains the Computer Science Student Resource Site at WilliamStallings.com/StudentSupport.html. This site provides documents and links on a variety of subjects of general interest to computer science students (and professionals).

†††††††† He is a member of the editorial board of Cryptologia, a scholarly journal devoted to all aspects of cryptology. He is a frequent lecturer and author of numerous technical papers. His books include Data and Computer Communications, Eighth Edition (Prentice Hall, 2007), which has become the standard in the field.

†††††††† Dr. Stallings holds a PhD from M.I.T. in Computer Science and a B.S. from Notre Dame in electrical engineering.

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