Heretics in the Temple: Americans who Reject the Nation's Legal Faith

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NYU Press, 1998 - Law - 201 pages
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For the half-century duration of the Cold War, the fallout shelter was a curiously American preoccupation. Triggered in 1961 by a hawkish speech by John F. Kennedy, the fallout shelter controversy—"to dig or not to dig," as Business Week put it at the time—forced many Americans to grapple with deeply disturbing dilemmas that went to the very heart of their self-image about what it meant to be an American, an upstanding citizen, and a moral human being.

Given the much-touted nuclear threat throughout the 1960s and the fact that 4 out of 5 Americans expressed a preference for nuclear war over living under communism, what's perhaps most striking is how few American actually built backyard shelters. Tracing the ways in which the fallout shelter became an icon of popular culture, Kenneth D. Rose also investigates the troubling issues the shelters raised: Would a post-war world even be worth living in? Would shelter construction send the Soviets a message of national resolve, or rather encourage political and military leaders to think in terms of a "winnable" war?

Investigating the role of schools, television, government bureaucracies, civil defense, and literature, and rich in fascinating detail—including a detailed tour of the vast fallout shelter in Greenbriar, Virginia, built to harbor the entire United States Congress in the event of nuclear armageddon—One Nation, Underground goes to the very heart of America's Cold War experience.

  

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Contents

From Abolition
24
Womens Natural Rights
51
LawRelated Socialist Conversion
76
A Study
106
Militia AntiAbortion
134
Notes
155
Bibliographical Essay
189
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

David Ray Papke is R. Bruce Townsend Professor of Law at the Indiana University School of Law, Indianapolis and Professor of Liberal Arts at Indiana University–Purdue University in Indianapolis. He is the author of Narrative and the Legal Discourse and Framing the Criminal: Crime, Cultural Work, and the Loss of Critical Perspective, 1830-1900. He is now a Professor of Law at Marquette University.

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