Enquire within upon everything [by R.K. Philp. Wanting sheet L]. (Google eBook)

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Page 128 - Always taking out of the meal-tub, and never putting in, soon comes to the bottom, as Poor Richard says; and then, When the well is dry, they know the worth of water. But this they might have known before, if they had taken his advice. If you would know the value of money, go and try to borrow some; for he that goes a borrowing goes a sorrowing...
Page 114 - Let onion atoms lurk within the bowl, And, scarce suspected, animate the whole ; And, lastly, in the flavoured compound toss A magic teaspoon of anchovy sauce.
Page 128 - When you have bought one fine thing, you must buy ten more, that your appearance may be all of a piece ; but Poor Dick says, ' It is easier to suppress the first desire, than to satisfy all that follow it.
Page 128 - A ploughman on his legs is higher than a gentleman on his knees, as Poor Richard says. Perhaps they have had a small estate left them, which they knew not the getting of; they think 'Tis day, and will never be night...
Page 128 - ... reduced to poverty, and forced to borrow of those whom they formerly despised, but who, through industry and frugality, have maintained their standing ; in which case it appears plainly, that ' A ploughman on his legs is higher than a gentleman on his knees,
Page 128 - He means, that perhaps the cheapness is apparent only, and not real; or the bargain, by straitening thee in thy business, may do thee more harm than good. For in another place he says, Many have been ruined by buying good pennyworths.
Page 128 - You call them goods ; but, if you do not take care, they will prove evils to some of you. You expect they will be sold cheap, and perhaps they may for less than they cost ; but, if you have no occasion for them, they must be dear to you. Remember what Poor Richard says, Buy what thou hast no need of, and ere long thou shalt sell thy necessaries.
Page 127 - So much for industry, my friends, and attention to one's own business; but to these we must add frugality if we would make our industry more certainly successful. A man may, if he knows not how to save as he gets, keep his nose all his life to the grindstone, and die not worth a groat at last. A fat kitchen makes a lean will; and Many estates are spent in the getting, Since women for tea forsook spinning and knitting, And men for punch forsook hewing and splitting.
Page 37 - B , his heirs, executors, and administrators, and his and their lands and tenements, goods and chattels, of, from, and against all and all manner of action and actions, suit and suits...
Page 248 - If the weather is to be fine, the leech lies motionless at the bottom of the glass and coiled together in a spiral form ; if rain may be expected, it will creep up to the top of its lodgings and remain there till the weather is settled ; if we are to have wind, it will move through its habitation with amazing swiftness, and seldom goes to rest till it begins to blow hard...

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