The Essential Tales of Chekhov

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Jun 20, 2000 - Fiction - 368 pages
23 Reviews

Of the two hundred stories that Anton Chekhov wrote, the twenty stories that appear in this extraordinary collection were personally chosen by Richard Ford--an accomplished storyteller in his own right. Included are the familiar masterpieces--"The Kiss," "The Darling," and "The Lady with the Dog"--as well as several brilliant lesser-known tales such as "A Blunder," "Hush!," and "Champagne." These stories, ordered from 1886 to 1899, are drawn from Chekhov's most fruitful years as a short-story writer. A truly balanced selection, they exhibit the qualities that make Chekhov one of the greatest fiction writers of all time: his gift for detail, dialogue, and humor; his emotional perception and compassion; and his understanding that life's most important moments are often the most overlooked.

"The reason we like Chekhov so much, now at our century's end," writes Ford in his perceptive introduction, "is because his stories from the last century's end feel so modern to us, are so much of our own time and mind." Exquisitely translated by the renowned Constance Garnett, these stories present a wonderful opportunity to introduce yourself--or become reaquainted with--an artist whose genius and influence only increase with every passing generation.

  

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You could say it is a mature & thoughtful love story. - Goodreads
His writing is objective and precise. - Goodreads
But then I flipped back to the intro and read it. - Goodreads

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - rmckeown - LibraryThing

Anton Chekhov was born January 17, 1860 in Taganrog, Ukraine. Chekhov studied medicine, and he began writing sketches for newspapers to pay his tuition. This profession brought him into contact with ... Read full review

Review: The Essential Tales of Chekhov

User Review  - Realini - Goodreads

The Illegitimate by Anton Chehov A great comedy farce I have been talking Chekhov with a Russian. I have met her at the pool at the Radisson and I teased her about Putin to begin with. 85% of the ... Read full review

Contents

A Blunder
3
A Trifle from Life
17
Hush
30
Enemies
51
Kashtanka
85
Neighbours
108
Ward No 6
124
An Anonymous Story
172
Peasants
237
Gooseberries
266
Copyright

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Page 273 - Behind the door of every contented, happy man there ought to be someone standing with a little hammer and continually reminding him with a knock that there are unhappy people, that however happy he may be, life will sooner or later show him its claws, and trouble will come to him illness, poverty, losses, and then no one will see or hear him, just as now he neither sees nor hears others.
Page 330 - ... and the season brings back the days of one's youth. The old limes and birches, white with hoar-frost, have a...
Page viii - How?" And it seemed as though in a little while the solution would be found, and then a new and splendid life would begin ; and it was clear to both of them that...
Page viii - Sergeyevna and he loved each other like people very close and akin, like husband and wife, like tender friends; it seemed to them that fate itself had meant them for one another, and they could not understand why he had a wife and she a husband; and it was as though they were a pair of birds of passage, caught and forced to live in different cages.
Page 150 - ... he must have had a soul capable of pity and indignation. Here in prison I have forgotten everything I have learned, or else I could have recalled something else. Take Christ, for instance: Christ responded to reality by weeping, smiling, being sorrowful and moved to wrath, even overcome by misery. He did not go to meet His sufferings with a smile, He did not despise death, but prayed in the Garden of Gethsemane that this cup might pass Him by.
Page 284 - The Darling Olenka, the daughter of the retired collegiate assessor, Plemyanniakov, was sitting in her back porch, lost in thought. It was hot, the flies were persistent and teasing, and it was pleasant to reflect that it would soon be evening. Dark rainclouds were gathering from the east, and bringing from time to time a breath of moisture in the air. Kukin, who was the manager of an open-air theatre called the Tivoli, and who lived in the lodge, was standing in the middle of the garden looking...
Page 272 - It was particularly oppressive at night. A bed was made up for me in the room next to my brother's bedroom, and I could hear that he was awake, and that he kept getting up and going to the plate of gooseberries and taking one.

About the author (2000)

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov was born in Taganrog, Ukraine in 1860. First published in the eighteen-eighties, he was a celebrated figure in Russia by the time of his death in 1904, but he remained relatively unknown internationally until the years after World War I, when his works were translated into English. His essays, plays, poetry, and short fiction have been translated into countless languages and he is remembered today as a master of the modern short story.

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