The People's Train

Front Cover
Hodder & Stoughton, Sep 27, 2012 - Fiction - 416 pages
7 Reviews
Artem Samsurov, a protégé of Lenin, makes an extraordinary escape from Tsarist Russia to reach sanctuary in Australia, but soon discovers that repression and injustice exist there too. Though distracted by an infatuation with a beautiful female lawyer, he throws himself back into the socialist cause, only to be imprisoned, then accused of murdering an informer. But he never loses his belief that the revolution will come - and in 1917, he returns to Russia alongside an Australian journalist to fight for it. Based on a true story, Keneally's enthralling novel takes us to the heart of the Russian Revolution through the dramatic exploits of one inspiring man. Once again, he illuminates a seismic period of history from an intimate, unusual perspective as he captures the ideals and passions behind a movement that changed the world.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - mbmackay - LibraryThing

Tom Keneally's fictional account based on real events involving a leading member of the 1917 Russian revolution and his 7 years or so exile in Brisbane in the period immediately before the revolution ... Read full review

Review: The People's Train

User Review  - Tamsin Burford - Goodreads

An interesting and eye opening observational tale of Australia on the cusp of the Frist World War and its entry to it from the standpoint of a Russian political activist, Artem who is fleeing arrest ... Read full review

About the author (2012)

Thomas Keneally began his writing career in 1964 and has published thirty novels since. They include Schindler's Ark, which won the Booker Prize in 1982 and was subsequently made into the film Schindler's List, and The Chant Of Jimmie Blacksmith, Confederates and Gossip From The Forest, each of which was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. His most recent novels are The Daughters Of Mars, which was shortlisted for the Walter Scott Prize in 2013, and Shame and the Captives. He has also written several works of non-fiction, including his memoir Homebush Boy, Searching for Schindler and Australians. He is married with two daughters and lives in Sydney.

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