Rip Van Winkle (Google eBook)

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R.H. Russell, 1897 - Catskill Mountains Region (N.Y.) - 35 pages
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Rip van winkle is a very interesting book. Rip Van Winkle was a lazy man who loved to help others instead of doing his own work. One day, he wanders off with his dog Wolf into the Catskill mountains to escape work and Dame Winkle‘s nagging. When Rip was tired of hunting squirrels, he fell asleep. When he woke up to go home, he saw a little man walking up the hill. He followed the man, and found a whole group of them. They gave Rip some flagon to drink. When he was drunk, he fell asleep. Upon waking up, he thinks someone has played a prank on him and taken his dog Wolf. Rip Van winkle slowly walked down to the village to discover that he had been asleep for about 20 years. Even though almost all his friends including his wife are not at the village, Rip finds his daughter, her husband Mr. Gardenier. The village accepts him and he lives the rest of his life with his daughter.
Rip Van Winkle is a meek, simple easy going person with a good nature. He was a very lazy man, who did whatever it took to avoid doing the house work. Instead, he would wander around the village giving children piggy-back rides, helping neighbors and assisting people on their work. Since he hated doing house work, he would go to the Inn, or go hunting in the Catskill mountains. He was very lazy, but also very kind, humble, helpful and kind hearted. He didn’t like to see others sad. He loved his dog, and was very soft hearted. He was henpecked and amiable who hated labor. He was very idles and careless. He “would rather starve on a penny then work for a pound”. He took the world very lightly, and would go with what was the easiest.
I think this teaches many a lesson and helps them see how bad it is to drink and be lazy.
 

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Page 20 - ... of excellent Hollands. He was naturally a thirsty soul, and was soon tempted to repeat the draught. One taste provoked another; and he reiterated his visits to the flagon so often that at length his senses were overpowered, his eyes swam in his head, his head gradually declined, and he fell into a deep sleep.
Page 28 - Where's Van Bummel, the schoolmaster?" "He went off to the wars too, was a great militia general, and is now in congress." Rip's heart died away at hearing of these sad changes in his home and friends, and finding himself thus alone in the world. Every answer puzzled him too, by treating of such enormous lapses of time, and of matters which he could not understand: war— congress— Stony Point;— he had no courage to ask after any more friends, but cried out in despair, "Does nobody here know...
Page 29 - Rip's heart died away at hearing of these sad changes in his home and friends, and finding himself thus alone in the world. Every answer puzzled him too, by treating of such enormous lapses of time, and of matters which he could not understand : war — congress — Stony Point; — he had no courage to ask after any more friends, but cried out in despair, " Does nobody here know Rip Van Winkle ? " " Oh, Rip Van Winkle ! " exclaimed two or three, '• Oh, to be sure ! that's Rip Van Winkle yonder,...
Page 8 - In that same village, and in one of these very houses (which, to tell the precise truth, was sadly time-worn and weather-beaten), there lived many years since, while the country was yet a province of Great Britain, a simple, good-natured fellow, of the name of Rip Van Winkle. He was a descendant of the Van Winkles who figured so gallantly in the chivalrous days of Peter Stuyvesant...
Page 23 - ... in the country round. Their dress, too, was of a different fashion from that to which he was accustomed. They all stared at him with equal marks of surprise, and whenever they cast their eyes upon him, invariably stroked their chins. The constant recurrence...
Page 20 - What seemed particularly odd to Rip was, that though these folks were evidently amusing themselves, yet they maintained the gravest faces, the most mysterious silence, and were, withal, the most melancholy party of pleasure he had ever witnessed. Nothing interrupted the stillness of the scene but the noise of the balls, which, whenever they were rolled, echoed along the mountains like rumbling peals of thunder.
Page 21 - what excuse shall I make to Dame Van Winkle!" He looked round for his gun, but in place of the clean well-oiled fowling-piece, he found an old firelock lying by him, the barrel encrusted with rust, the lock falling off, and the stock worm-eaten.
Page 25 - He found the house gone to decay — the roof fallen in, the windows shattered, and the doors off the hinges. A halfstarved dog that looked like Wolf was skulking about it. Rip called him by name, but the cur snarled, showed his teeth, and passed on. This was an unkind cut indeed. "My very dog," sighed poor Rip, "has forgotten me!
Page 14 - Bummel, the schoolmaster, a dapper learned little man, who was not to be daunted by the most gigantic word in the dictionary; and how sagely they would deliberate upon public events some months after they had taken place.
Page 23 - He grieved to give up his dog and gun; he dreaded to meet his wife; but it would not do to starve among the mountains. He shook his head, shouldered the rusty firelock, and, with a heart full of trouble and anxiety, turned his steps homeward.

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