Lives of the Engineers, with an Account of Their Principal Works: Comprising Also a History of Inland Communication in Britain, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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J. Murray, 1862 - Engineers
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Page 209 - Who but Mr. Stephenson would have thought of entering into Chat Moss, carrying it out almost like wet dung ? It is ignorance almost inconceivable. It is perfect madness, in a person called upon to speak on a scientific subject, to propose such a plan. . . . Every part of the scheme shows that this man has applied himself to a subject of which he has no knowledge, and to which he has no science to apply.
Page 152 - It was set forth in the preamble that these different lines " will be of great public utility, by facilitating the conveyance of coal, iron, lime, corn, and other commodities, from the interior of the county of Durham...
Page 116 - Pit on the 4th of November, and was found to burn better than the first lamp, and to be perfectly safe. But, as it did not yet come up entirely to the inventor's expectations, he proceeded to contrive a third lamp, in which he proposed to surround the oil vessel with a number of capillary tubes. Then it struck him that if he cut off the middle of the tubes, or made holes in metal plates, placed at a distance from each other equal to the length of the tubes, the air would get in better, and the effect...
Page 200 - What can be more palpably absurd and ridiculous than the prospect held out of locomotives travelling twice as fa-st as stage - coaches ! We would as soon expect the people of Woolwich to suffer themselves to be fired off upon one of Congreve's ricochet rockets, as trust themselves to the mercy of such a machine going at such a rate.
Page 167 - The time is coming when it will be cheaper for a working man to travel on a railway than to walk on foot.
Page 167 - I may not live so long, when railways will come to supersede almost all other methods of conveyance in this country when mail-coaches will go by railway, and railroads will become the great highway for the king and all his subjects. The time is coming when it will be cheaper for a working man to travel...
Page 99 - The mode of communicating the motive power to the wheels by means of the spur gear also caused frequent jerks, each cylinder alternately propelling or becoming propelled by the other, as the pressure of the one upon the wheels became greater or less than the pressure of the other ; and, when the teeth of the cogwheel became at all worn, a rattling noise was produced during the travelling of the engine.
Page 203 - It was not an easy task for me to keep the engine down to ten miles an hour, but it must be done, and I did my best. I had to place myself in that most unpleasant of all positions the witness-box of a Parliamentary Committee. I was not long in it...
Page 161 - I know all about it," said he; " and you will wonder how I learnt it. I will tell you. When I was a brakesman at Killingworth, I learnt the art of embroidery while working the pitmen's buttonholes by the engine fire at night.
Page 167 - I have said will come to pass as sure as you live. I only wish I may live to see the day, though that I can scarcely hope for, as I know how slow all human progress is, and with what difficulty I have been able to get the locomotive thus far adopted, notwithstanding my more than ten years' successful experiment at Killingworth.

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