Ancient China and its Enemies: The Rise of Nomadic Power in East Asian History (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Feb 25, 2002 - History
4 Reviews
Relations between Inner Asian nomads and Chinese are a continuous theme throughout Chinese history. By investigating the formation of nomadic cultures, by analyzing the evolution of patterns of interaction along China's frontiers, and by exploring how this interaction was recorded in historiography, this looks at the origins of the cultural and political tensions between these two civilizations through the first millennium BC. The main purpose of the book is to analyze ethnic, cultural, and political frontiers between nomads and Chinese in the historical contexts that led to their formation, and to look at cultural perceptions of 'others' as a function of the same historical process. Based on both archaeological and textual sources, this 2002 book also introduces a new methodological approach to Chinese frontier history, which combines extensive factual data with a careful scrutiny of the motives, methods, and general conception of history that informed the Chinese historian Ssu-ma Ch'ien.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Ancient China and its Enemies: The Rise of Nomadic Power in East Asian History

User Review  - Xiaomin Zu - Goodreads

In this monograph, Di Cosmo successfully incorporates archaeological sources into the historical studies of ancient China, a methodology that takes the historical studies out of the tradition of mere ... Read full review

Review: Ancient China and its Enemies: The Rise of Nomadic Power in East Asian History

User Review  - Patricia_Bjaaland - Goodreads

An intense and in-depth look at the Xiongnu of ancient China (focusing on the Ch'in and Han Dynasties). A bit long-winded but important reading for those seeking a stronger understanding of the steppe ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
11
III
13
IV
44
V
91
VI
93
VII
127
VIII
159
X
206
XI
255
XII
294
XIII
313
XIV
319
XV
335
XVI
361
Copyright

IX
161

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2002)

Nicola Di Cosmo is Senior Lecturer in Chinese History at the University of Canterbury (Christchurch, New Zealand).

Bibliographic information