The Steppe and Other Stories

Front Cover
Knopf, 1991 - Fiction - 348 pages
5 Reviews
(Book Jacket Status: Not Jacketed)

Anton Chekhov widely hailed as the supreme master of the short story also wrote five works long enough to be called short novels–here brought together in one volume for the first time in a masterly new translation by the award-winning translators Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky.The Steppe–the most lyrical of the five–is an account of a nine-year-old boy’s frightening journey by wagon train across the steppe of southern Russia. The Duel sets two decadent figures–a fanatical rationalist and a man of literary sensibility–on a collision course that ends in a series of surprising reversals. In The Story of an Unknown Man, a political radical spying on an important official by serving as valet to his son gradually discovers that his own terminal illness has changed his long-held priorities in startling ways. Three Years recounts a complex series of ironies in the personal life of a rich but passive Moscow merchant. In My Life, a man renounces wealth and social position for a life of manual labor. The resulting conflict between the moral simplicity of his ideals and the complex realities of human nature culminates in a brief apocalyptic vision that is unique in Chekhov’s work.

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Review: The Steppe and Other Stories, 1887-1891

User Review  - Sebastiano - Goodreads

The Steppe is the fascinating tale of young Yegorushka travelling through the interminable Russian steppe to reach his boarding school. Yegorushka travels with his uncle and his uncle's friend and ... Read full review

Review: The Steppe and Other Stories, 1887-1891

User Review  - JacobCHR - Goodreads

Nice prose and interessting characters. Russian culture is so different from what i am used too, so this was a very interessting peak into the history of old mother Russia. Read full review

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About the author (1991)

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov was born in the provincial town of Taganrog, Ukraine, in 1860. In the mid-1880s, Chekhov became a physician, and shortly thereafter he began to write short stories. Chekhov started writing plays a few years later, mainly short comic sketches he called vaudvilles. The first collection of his humorous writings, Motley Stories, appeared in 1886, and his first play, Ivanov, was produced in Moscow the next year. In 1896, the Alexandrinsky Theater in St. Petersburg performed his first full- length drama, The Seagull. Some of Chekhov's most successful plays include The Cherry Orchard, Uncle Vanya, and Three Sisters. Chekhov brought believable but complex personalizations to his characters, while exploring the conflict between the landed gentry and the oppressed peasant classes. Chekhov voiced a need for serious, even revolutionary, action, and the social stresses he described prefigured the Communist Revolution in Russia by twenty years. He is considered one of Russia's greatest playwrights. Chekhov contracted tuberculosis in 1884, and was certain he would die an early death. In 1901, he married Olga Knipper, an actress who had played leading roles in several of his plays. Chekhov died in 1904, spending his final years in Yalta.

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