The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection: Or, the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life

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Echo Library, 2006 - Science - 608 pages
32 Reviews
Superb new edition of the book that revolutionized the study of biology and permanently altered man's idea of his earthly origins. Distinguished as one of the most readable and accessible works of the scientific imagination ever written. 90 black-and-white illustrations.

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Review: The Origin of Species

User Review  - Clif Hostetler - Goodreads

My book group selected this book for discussion probably because of the historic impact it has had on the field of science. However, I found it to be very worthy of respect from a literary viewpoint ... Read full review

Review: On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection

User Review  - Reg - Goodreads

This book had been mentioned in a few books that I've read recently, so I thought I should give it a go. I started with zeal, but soon lost it. By the time I made it to the half way point, I was ... Read full review

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About the author (2006)

Charles Robert Darwin, born in 1809, was an English naturalist who founded the theory of Darwinism, the belief in evolution as determined by natural selection. Although Darwin studied medicine at Edinburgh University, and then studied at Cambridge University to become a minister, he had been interested in natural history all his life. His grandfather, Erasmus Darwin, was a noted English poet, physician, and botanist who was interested in evolutionary development. Darwin's works have had an incalculable effect on all aspects of the modern thought. Darwin's most famous and influential work, On the Origin of Species, provoked immediate controversy. Darwin's other books include Zoology of the Voyage of the Beagle, The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex. Charles Darwin died in 1882.

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