Report of the Joint Committee on Reconstruction, at the First Session, Thirty-ninth Congress (Google eBook)

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1866 - Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877) - 791 pages
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Page 93 - The proceeds of all lands that have been or hereafter may be granted by the United States to this State for the support of schools...
Page 86 - This enumeration of rights shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people; and to guard against any encroachments on the rights herein retained, or any transgression of any of the higher powers herein delegated, we declare that everything in this article is excepted out of the general powers of the government, and shall forever remain inviolate; and that all laws contrary thereto, or to the other provisions herein contained, shall be void.
Page v - Resolved, by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, (two-thirds of both houses concurring) : That the following article be proposed to the legislatures of the several States as an Amendment to the Constitution of the United States...
Page 85 - That all men have a natural and indefeasible right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own consciences; that no man can of right be compelled to attend, erect, or support any place of worship, or to maintain any ministry against his consent...
Page 89 - In case of a disagreement between the two houses, with respect to the time of adjournment...
Page 30 - All power is inherent in the people, and all free governments are founded on their authority and instituted for their peace, safety and happiness. For the advancement of these ends they have at all times an inalienable and indefeasible right to alter, reform or abolish their government in such manner as they may think proper.
Page 81 - That no man shall be taken or imprisoned, or disseized of his freehold, liberties or privileges, or outlawed or exiled, or in any manner destroyed, or deprived of his life, liberty, or property, but by the judgment of his peers, or the law of the land.
Page 87 - Representatives, in all cases except treason, felony, and breach of the peace, shall be privileged from arrest, during the session of the General Assembly, and in going to and returning from the same...
Page 26 - The government of the United States, then, though limited in its powers, is supreme; and its laws, when made in pursuance of the Constitution, form the supreme law of the land, ' ' anything in the Constitution or laws of any State to the contrary notwithstanding.
Page 6 - That all political power is inherent in the people, and all free governments are founded on their authority...

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