The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy: Which Far Exceeds Any Thing of the Kind Yet Published ... To which are Added, One Hundred and Fifty New and Useful Receipts. And Also Fifty Receipts for Different Articles of Perfumery. With a Copious Index (Google eBook)

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W. Strahan [and 25 others], 1784 - Cookery, English - 409 pages
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Page 303 - ... it very well ; pour it into a clean tub, and when it is almost cold, set it to work with yeast spread upon a toast. Let it stand five or six...
Page 342 - ... in (with his head above water) longer than half a minute, if the water be very cold; after this he must go in three times a week for a fortnight longer.
Page 182 - ... well together with half a pint of brandy, and half a pint of sack, put it down close in a stone pot, and it will keep good three or four months.
Page 294 - Beat the whites of four eggs or more to a froth, stir it altogether that the whites may mix well with the jelly, and pour it in as if you were cooling it. Let it boil two or three minutes, then put in the juice of three or four lemons, and let it boil a minute or two longer.
Page 303 - ... to every six gallons put in a quart of brandy, and let it stand six weeks ; if it is fine, bottle it ; if it is not, draw it off as clear as you can into another vessel, or large bottles, and in a fortnight bottle it in small bottles. Ibid.
Page 139 - Bread-pudding, tie it loose; if a Batter-pudding, tie it close; and be sure the Water boils when you put the Pudding in, and you should move the Puddings in the Pot now and then, for fear they stick. When you make a Batter-pudding, first mix the Flour well with a little Milk, then put in the Ingredients by Degrees, and it will be smooth and not have Lumps; but for a plain Batter-pudding, the best way is to strain it through a coarse Hair Sieve, that it may neither have Lumps nor the Treadles of the...
Page 188 - You may make it with cream thus: boil celery as above, and :uM mace, nutmeg, a piece of butter as big as a walnut rolled in flour, and a half a pint of cream; boil all together.
Page 69 - Serve this up by itself, with good gravy in the dish, for every body does not love oyster-sauce. This makes a pretty side-dish for supper, or a corner-dish of a table for dinner. If you chafe it in a dish, add half a pint of gravy to it, and boil it up together.
Page 149 - ... pared, cored, and quartered, and a pint of fair water. Let them boil till the pippins break ; put the liquor to your orange or lemon, and half the pulp of the pippins well broken and a pound of fugar. Boil...
Page 222 - ... orange-flower water; beat up the yolks of eight eggs and the whites of four; mix all well together; put in a quarter of a pound of...

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