Wood-working Tools: How to Use Them. A Manual (Google eBook)

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Ginn & Heath, for the Industrial School Association, 1881 - Woodwork (Manual training) - 101 pages
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Page iv - A single ward-room, like the one used by the school in Church Street, in any city, for the six months from December to May, during which time it usually lies idle, with very little expense beyond the original plant and a moderate salary to the teacher, would meet all the needs of three or four of the largest grammar schools for boys. Three such supplementary schools, if used in turn, would amply satisfy all the rightful claims of industrial education of this kind upon the school system of such a...
Page iii - A COURSE of simple lessons in the use of the universal tools : the hammer, knife, axe, plane, rule, chalk-line, square, gauge, chisel, saw, and augur. The lessons are so amply illustrated that any bright boy will find the book alone a great help in his endeavors to learn the right way of using common tools. Nearly half of the illustrations were taken from life, and are efficient substitutes for lengthy and important printed instructions. The book is the result of actual experiments successfully made...
Page iv - ... of three or four of the largest grammar schools for boys. Three such supplementary schools, if used in turn, would amply satisfy all the rightful claims of industrial education of this kind upon the school system of such a city as Boston. At so small an outlay of attention and money might the...
Page iv - ... are few in number, and simple in character. They aim only to give an elementary training in the manipulations common to all wood-working trades. But it is not chiefly in the interest of these or of any other trades that this course is offered to the public. Lessons like these, given at the same time with the studies now pursued in our grammar schools, would relieve the weariness of purely mental exercises, and give a new zest to their pursuit. A single ward-room, like the one used by the school...
Page vii - It now became evident that so explicit and complete a work as was at first contemplated would occupy too much time in preparation, and, when done, might be too large and too costly to meet the ends that the association had chiefly in view.

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