A System of Logic: Ratiocinative and Inductive; Being a Connected View of the Principles of Evidence and the Methods of Scientific Investigation (Google eBook)

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Harper, 1850 - Knowledge, Theory of - 593 pages
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John Stuart Mill embarks on a lengthy and in-depth treatment of Logic in this treatise; he covers, in particular, quite a bit about the meaning of specific terms and their attributes. Not for the faint of heart, worth re-reading to capture more of the knowledge and thought put into this work.

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Page 224 - If two or more instances of the phenomenon under investigation have only one circumstance in common, the circumstance in which alone all the instances agree is the cause (or effect) of the given phenomenon.
Page 601 - A Dictionary of Science, Literature, and Art : Comprising the History, Description, and Scientific Principles of every Branch of Human Knowledge ; with the Derivation and Definition of all the Terms in General Use. Edited by WT BRANDE, FRSL and E.
Page 230 - Subduct from any phenomenon such part as is known by previous inductions to be the effect of certain antecedents, and the residue of the phenomenon is the effect of the remaining antecedents.
Page 200 - The cause, then, philosophically speaking, is the sum total of the conditions, positive and negative, taken together; the whole of the contingencies of every description, which being realized, the consequent invariably follows.
Page 197 - The real Cause, is the whole of these antecedents; and we have, philosophically speaking, no right to give the name of cause to one of them, exclusively of the others.
Page 184 - Whatever be the most proper mode of expressing it, the proposition that the course of nature is uniform is the fundamental principle, or general axiom, of Induction. It would yet be a great error to offer this large generalisation as any explanation of the inductive process. On the contrary, I hold it to be itself an instance of induction, and induction by no means of the most obvious kind. Far from being the first induction we make, it is one of the last, or at all events one of those which...
Page 91 - The simplest and most correct notion of a Definition is, a proposition declaratory of the meaning of a word...
Page 363 - ... that the squares of the periodic times of the planets are proportional to the cubes of their mean distances from the sun.
Page 342 - The uniformity in the succession of events, otherwise called the law of causation, must fee received not as a law of the universe, but of that portion of it only which is within the range of our means of sure observation, with a reasonable degree of extension to adjacent cases.
Page 113 - When the middle term is made the subject of the major premiss, and the predicate of the minor...

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