Communication Technologies for the Elderly: Vision, Hearing, and Speech

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Rosemary Lubinski, D. Jeffery Higginbotham
Singular Publishing Group, 1997 - Medical - 369 pages
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As the population ages-the elderly presently comprise 13% of the U.S. population, a number which is expected to grow to 22% in the next 50 years-so does the need for technology to make up for the degeneration and loss of the faculties of hearing, speech, and vision. Fortunately, there have been great strides in such technologies. this volume, with contributions from experts in various fields, addresses the complex needs of the elderly and what aids are available to improve their quality of life.As the population ages-the elderly presently comprise 13% of the U.S. population, a number which is expected to grow to 22% in the next 50 years-so does the need for technology to make up for the degeneration and loss of the faculties of hearing, speech, and vision. Fortunately, there have been great strides in such technologies. this volume, with contributions from experts in various fields, addresses the complex needs of the elderly and what aids are available to improve their quality of life.TEXTBOOK

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Contents

A Critique
23
Changes in Vision and Aging
41
Assistive Technologies for Older Persons
71
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Dr. Lubinski is a Professor in the Department of Communicative Disorders and Sciences at the University at Buffalo, SUNY. She has published several texts, including Dementia and Communication, Communication Technologies for the Elderly, and A Guide to Cultural Competence in the Curriculum: Speech-Language Pathology, along with more than peer-reviewed articles. A Fellow of ASHA, she speaks nationally and internationally on topics related to aging and communication, as well as professional issues.

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