Managing Information in Complex Organizations: Semiotics and Signals, Complexity and Chaos

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M.E. Sharpe, 2005 - Business & Economics - 248 pages
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This seminal work presents an effective design for processing information through five stages from data to actionable knowledge in order to influence behavior within organizations. The authors incorporate such concepts as evolution; semiotics; entropy; complexity; emergence; crisis; and chaos theory in an intriguing alternative to crisis management that can be applied to any organization. Their model shows how to evaluate and share information to enable the organization to avoid disaster rather than simply respond to it.

Additionally, the text presents the first attempt at a multi-disciplinary view of information processing in organizations by tying associated disciplines to their respective impacts on the information process. Illustrations used in the text include an overlay that demonstrates how the non-use of information between agencies contributed to the 9/11 disaster, and an appendix addresses Organizing for Cyberterrorism.

  

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Contents

Semantics Cybernetics
9
Information Forms and Dependence
25
Information Processing Complexity and Crises
112
Barriers to Optimal Information Processing
128
Setting Up the Organization for Optimal
146
Recap and Real Time
169
Epilogue
191
Appendix B Bibliography and Suggested Readings
211
Notes
217
Index
235
About the Authors
249
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Kevin C. Desouza is the director of the Metropolitan Institute and an associate professor at the Center for Public Administration and Policy at Virginia Tech.

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