Proceedings of the First Three Republican National Conventions of 1856, 1860 and 1864: Including Proceedings of the Antecedent National Convention Held at Pittsburg, in February, 1856, as Reported by Horace Greeley (Google eBook)

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C.W. Johnson, 1893 - 264 pages
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Page 135 - That the maintenance inviolate of the rights of the States, and especially the right of each State to order and control its own domestic institutions according to its own judgment exclusively...
Page 132 - That as our Republican fathers, when they had abolished slavery in all our national territory, ordained that "no person should be deprived of life, liberty or property, without due process of law...
Page 147 - That the Republican party is opposed to any change in our naturalization laws, or any state legislation, by which the rights of citizenship hitherto accorded to immigrants from foreign lands shall be abridged or impaired ; and in favor of giving a full and efficient protection to the rights of all classes of citizens, whether native or naturalized, both at home and abroad.
Page 136 - That the maintenance of the principles promulgated in the Declaration of Independence and embodied in the Federal Constitution...
Page 129 - Constitution is essential to the preservation of our republican institutions, and that the Federal Constitution, the rights of the States, and the Union of the States, shall be preserved.
Page 129 - Congress has uttered or countenanced the threats of disunion so often made by Democratic members, without rebuke and with applause from their political associates; and we denounce those threats of disunion, in case of a popular overthrow of their ascendency, as denying the vital principles of a Free Government, and as an avowal of contemplated treason, which it is the imperative duty of an indignant people sternly to rebuke and forever silence.
Page 226 - That we approve the position taken by the Government that the people of the United States can never regard with indifference the attempt of any European power to overthrow by force, or to supplant by fraud, the institutions of any republican government on the western continent; and that they will view with extreme jealousy, as menacing to the peace and independence of their own country, the efforts of any such power to obtain new footholds for monarchical governments, sustained by foreign military...
Page 143 - That appropriations by Congress for river and harbor improvements of a national character, required for the accommodation and security of an existing commerce, are authorized by the Constitution and justified by the obligation of government to protect the lives and property of its citizens.
Page 226 - That we deem it essential to the general welfare that harmony should prevail in the National Councils; and we regard as worthy of public confidence and official trust, those only who cordially indorse the principles proclaimed in these resolutions, and which should characterize the administration of the Government.
Page 42 - That a railroad to the Pacific ocean is imperatively demanded by the interests of the whole country ; that the Federal Government ought to .render immediate and efficient aid in its construction ; and that, as preliminary thereto, a daily overland mail should be promptly established.

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