The Gentleman's Magazine, and Historical Chronicle, for the Year ..., Volume 179 (Google eBook)

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Edw. Cave, 1736-[1868], 1846 - Literature
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Page 615 - By faith Moses, when he was born, was hid three months of his parents, because they saw he was a proper child : and they were not afraid of the king's commandment.'^ "And when she could no longer hide him, she took for him an ark of bulrushes, and put the child therein, and she laid it in the flags by the
Page 377 - is discomfited— Ten thousand bold Scots, two and twenty knights, Balk'd in their own blood did Sir Walter see On Holmedon's plains : of prisoners Hotspur took Mordake, the Earl of Fife, and eldest son To beaten Douglas : and the Earls of Athol, Of Murray,
Page 267 - the public that I have lived many years in intimacy with you. It may serve the interests of mankind also to inform them that the greatest wit may be found in a character without impairing the most unaffected piety.
Page 617 - bondage in mortar, and in brick, and in all manner of service in the field ; all their service wherein they made them serve was with rigour."* The
Page 268 - crimes such as yours should not come before Fielding ? For giving advice that is not worth a straw May well be called picking of pockets in law; And picking of pockets, with which I now charge ye, Is, by quinto Elizabeth, death without clergy. What justice, when both to the Old Bailey brought
Page 268 - Mr. Bunbury frets, and I fret like the devil, To see them so cowardly, lucky, and civil. Yet still I sit snug, and continue to sigh on, Till made by my losses as bold as a lion. I venture at all, while my avarice regards The whole pool as my own. Come, give me five cards.
Page 615 - when she could no longer hide him, she took for him an ark of bulrushes, and put the child therein, and she laid it in the flags by the
Page 269 - .—How does it surprise one— Two handsomer culprits I never set eyes on. Then their friends all come round me with cringing and leering, To melt me with pity, and soften my swearing. First, Sir Charles advances, with phrases well strung;
Page 415 - for charitable prayers, shards, flints, and pebbles should be thrown on her." Mr. Keller supposed that Shakspere had in view some ancient usage, retained possibly in some
Page 355 - The pilot of some small night-foundered skiff, Deeming some island, oft as seamen tell, With fixed anchor in his scaly rind, Moors by his side,

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