Conferring with readers: supporting each student's growth and independence

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Heinemann, 2007 - Education - 203 pages
13 Reviews
A great reading conference only takes five minutes, but its impact can last a lifetime. That's because conferences are the critical, one-to-one teaching that forms the backbone of reading instruction. Conferring with Readers shows you how to confer well and demonstrates why a few moments with students every week can put them on the path to becoming better, more independent readers.

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Review: Conferring with Readers: Supporting Each Student's Growth and Independence

User Review  - Kari - Goodreads

great reference book for readers workshop teachers. read the chapters you need, skip the ones you don't. Read full review

Review: Conferring with Readers: Supporting Each Student's Growth and Independence

User Review  - Erlyne - Goodreads

Great book for supporting conferring work, especially with middle and upper elementary students. Read full review

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Contents

What It Means to Teach Reading
7
16
41
Supporting Students During WholeClass Studies
61
Copyright

7 other sections not shown

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About the author (2007)

Gravity Goldberg is coauthor of the Heinemann title Conferring with Readers (2007). She is a full-time staff developer at the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project at Columbia University, where she consults with principals, coaches, and teachers in New York City and throughout the country. Gravity was a special educator and third-grade teacher in Boston and is currently a doctoral candidate at Teachers College, Columbia University, where she is also a part-time instructor in the preservice early childhood education department.

Jennifer Serravallo is the author and coauthor of the Heinemann titles Teaching Reading in Small Groups and Conferring with Readers. Jen came to New York City after graduating from Vassar College to develop her passion for urban education reform. While working toward her MA at Teachers College, Columbia University, she taught grades 3-5 in two Title I schools with swelling class sizes, high numbers of ELLs, and an enormous range of learners. For the past six years she's been a full-time staff developer and a national consultant with the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project, where she helps urban, suburban, and rural schools implement exceptional literacy instruction through reading and writing workshop. What she shares in Teaching Reading in Small Groups comes from the work in her classroom and from the classrooms where she consults.

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