Crime Buff's Guide to Outlaw Washington, DC

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Rowman & Littlefield, Sep 4, 2012 - History - 232 pages
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Washington D.C. isn't known as the "District of Crime" or "Murder Capital of America" for nothing.  Though the capital city's motto is "justice for all," D.C. has a darker side, including an extensive history of crimes and misdemeanors, some political and some not.  The Crime Buff's Guide to Outlaw Washington D.C. is the ultimate guidebook to the criminal and seedy history of the nation's capital -- plus Maryland, Northern Virginia and (ironically) Arlington National Cemetery. It also contains an entire chapter pinpointing key and little-known sites in the Lincoln Assassination.  With photographs, maps, directions, and precise GPS coordinates, this collection of outlaw tales serves as both a travel guide and an entertaining and enlightening read.  It is a one-of-a-kind exploration into well-known and more obscure sites in D.C. that retain memories of bandits, corpse-snatchers, murderers, snipers, bootleggers, assassins, rogue scientists, spies, mobsters and corrupt politicians -- even a legendary serial killer dressed in a bunny suit -- and their scandalous deeds.

  

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Great fun outloud read while traveling down the highway. Many of the events have a Paul Harvey "Rest of the Story" mystery feel. This kept the driver's mind alert and able to drive without getting sleepy. Much more than just a tourist guide to sites around Washington D.C.

Contents

Body
1
Acknowledgments
216
Index
217
Back Cover
223
Spine
224
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Ron Franscell is a rising true-crime figure, a seasoned traveler and a Texan. Ron has ridden the wide range between journalism, fiction and nonfiction with extraordinary success. Ron’s third book, an intimate nonfiction originally entitled "FALL: The Rape and Murder of Innocence in a Small Town," was published in January 2007 and established him as one of the most provocative new voices in narrative nonfiction. FALL (and its best-selling 2008 paperback edition entitled THE DARKEST NIGHT) is the true story of two girls, two men and an entire town — all changed by one harrowing night. But this suspenseful, atmospheric and moving account is more than a typical true-crime yarn; it’s a classic tragedy told by someone who was there, about how the past echoes poisonously into the present — for individuals, for families, for entire communities.

 

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