An introduction to heraldry, by H.Clark (Google eBook)

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1829
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Page 257 - Smith, they be made good cheap in this kingdom : for whosoever studieth the laws of the realm, who studieth in the universities, who professeth the liberal sciences, and, to be short, who can live idly and without manual labour, and will bear the port, charge, and countenance of a gentleman, he shall be called master, and shall be taken for a gentleman.
Page 262 - ... to the study of holy scripture ; and out of the time of divine service to the reading of chronicles. For there indeed are virtues studied, and vices exiled; so that, for the endowment of virtue, and abandoning of vice, knights and barons, with other states, and noblemen of the realm, place their children in those innes, though they desire not to have them learned in the laws, nor to live by the practice thereof, but only upon their father's allowance.
Page 242 - Sovereign of the Most Honourable Military Order of the Bath, is desirous of commemorating the auspicious termination of the long and arduous contests in which this empire has been engaged, and of marking in an especial manner his gracious sense of the valour, perseverance, and devotion, manifested by the officers of his Majesty's forces by sea and land...
Page 243 - Officer in his Majesty's service who shall not have attained the rank of Major-General in the army, or Rear-Admiral in the navy, except as to the Twelve Knights Grand Crosses who may be nominated and appointed for civil services.
Page 181 - Look upon the rainbow, and praise him that made it; very beautiful it is in the brightness thereof. It compasseth the heaven about with a glorious circle, and the hands of the Most High have bended it.
Page 84 - BEND is an ordinary formed by two diagonal lines drawn from the dexter chief to the sinister base, and contains the third part if charged ; and uncharged, the fifth of the field; it is supposed to represent a shoulder-belt, or a scarf.
Page 274 - Body. Gentlemen of the Privy Chamber. Esquires of the Knights of the Bath. Esquires by Creation. Esquires by Office. Younger Sons of Knights of the Garter. Younger Sons of Bannerets of both kinds. Younger Sons of Knights of the Bath. Younger Sons of Knights Bachelors. Gentlemen entitled to hear arms.
Page 92 - The camel knows the garments of him by whom he has been treated with injustice; seizes them in his teeth ; shakes them with violence ; and tramples on them in a rage. When his anger is appeased, he leaves them, and then the owner of...
Page 134 - Romans, had moveable towers, built ' of wood, and of fuch a height, that the tops of them overlooked the battlements of the city. They were covered with raw hides, to...
Page 273 - Chancellor of the Exchequer. Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench. Master of the Rolls. Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas. Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer. Judges and Barons of the degree of the Coif of the said Courts, according to Seniority.

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