The Street of Crocodiles

Front Cover
Penguin, 1977 - Fiction - 160 pages
26 Reviews
The Street of Crocodiles in the Polish city of Drogobych is a street of memories and dreams where recollections of Bruno Schulz's uncommon boyhood and of the eerie side of his merchant family's life are evoked in a startling blend of the real and the fantastic. Most memorable - and most chilling - is the portrait of the author's father, a maddened shopkeeper who imports rare birds' eggs to hatch in his attic, who believes tailors' dummies should be treated like people, and whose obsessive fear of cockroaches causes him to resemble one. Bruno Schulz, a Polish Jew killed by the Nazis in 1942, is considered by many to have been the leading Polish writer between the two world wars.
  

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Review: The Street of Crocodiles

User Review  - Matthew - Goodreads

The perfect musty little volume to purchase for a dollar in the lower reaches of the Pike Place market in Seattle. His writing took a little getting used to. Since I was expecting something similar to ... Read full review

Review: The Street of Crocodiles

User Review  - Daniel - Goodreads

A labyrinth of sentences permeating the pages. Schulz's collection of shorts are unique and poetic, but seemed overladen with turgid metaphors and confusing images. The entire story is set in a dreamy ... Read full review

Contents

III
25
IV
36
V
45
VI
51
VII
59
VIII
63
IX
66
X
72
XII
81
XIII
85
XIV
99
XV
111
XVI
117
XVII
125
XVIII
139
Copyright

XI
77

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Popular passages

Page 18 - in a run of normal uneventful years that great eccentric, Time, begets sometimes other years, different, prodigal years which—like a sixth, smallest toe—grow a thirteenth freak month.
Page 18 - The Messiah, in which the myth of the coming of the Messiah would symbolize a return to the happy perfection that existed at the beginningin Schulzian terms, the return to childhood.
Page 18 - Schulzian time-his mythic time—obedient and submissive to man, offers artistic recompense for the profaned time of everyday life, which relentlessly subordinates all things to itself and carries events and people off in a current of evanescence. Schulz introduces a subjective, psychological time and then gives it substance, objectivity, by subjecting the course of occurrences to its laws.

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About the author (1977)

Bruno Schulz, (18921942) wrote stories, assorted criticism, and a lost work thought to be called "The Messiah,"
Jonathan Safran Foer is the bestselling author of "Everything Is Illuminated" and "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close,"
David A. Goldfarb taught for eight years in the Slavic department at Barnard College, Columbia University.
Celina Wieniewska is an award-winning translator.

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