Is the Copernican System of Astronomy True? (Google eBook)

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Standard publishing Company, 1888 - Solar system - 212 pages
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Page 69 - Heat is a very brisk agitation of the insensible parts of the object, which produces in us that sensation from whence we denominate the object hot ; so what in our sensation is heat, in the object is nothing but motion.
Page 6 - The square of the period of a planet is proportional to the cube of its mean distance from the Sun.
Page 3 - ... conclusion upon this head ; and it seems, therefore, demonstrated, that the amount of such parallax, even for the nearest fixed star which has hitherto been examined with the requisite attention, remains still mixed up with, and concealed among, the errors incidental to all astronomical determinations. Now, such is the nicety to which these have been carried, that did the quantity in question amount to a single second, that is, did the radius of the earth's orbit subtend at the nearest fixed...
Page 74 - ... diminishing, or, in other words, the mean distance from the sun, or the major axis of the ellipse, dwindling by slow but regular degrees. This is evidently the effect which would be produced by a resistance experienced by the comet from a very rare...
Page 3 - ... measurable amount of annual parallax in the stars, and that by its means we should come to a knowledge of their distance. But, after exhausting every refinement of observation, astronomers have been unable to come to any positive and coincident conclusion upon this head ; and it seems, therefore, demonstrated, that the amount of such parallax, even for the nearest fixed star which has hitherto been examined with the requisite attention, remains still mixed up with, and concealed among, the errors...
Page 15 - ... by a substance almost infinitely elastic, through which the pulses of light make their way. . . . The luminous ether fills stellar space; it makes the universe a whole, and renders possible the intercommunication of light" and energy between star and star.
Page 35 - The square of the hypothenuse is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides ; as, 5033 402+302.
Page 74 - Accordingly, no other mode of accounting for the phenomenon in question appearing, this is the solution proposed by Encke, and generally received. It will, therefore, probably fall ultimately into the sun, should it not first be dissipated altogether, a thing no way improbable, when the lightness of its materials is considered...
Page 35 - The square of the hypothenuse of a right angled triangle is equal to the sum of the squares of both the other sides.
Page 65 - ... true without exception, is also a law of nature, though the phenomenon of which it is the law is special, and not, like gravitation, universal.

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