Norwood

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Arcadia Publishing, 2006 - History - 127 pages
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Norwood has long used the tagline “Gem of the Highlands.”

While the origin of this name is not clear, it is believed to refer to Norwood's beautiful locale among the hills and valleys of southwestern Ohio. Norwood got its start in 1809, when Samuel D. Bowman opened a tavern for travelers at the intersection of present-day Montgomery and Smith Roads. During the early 1900s, industries flocked to the area because of easy access to crisscrossing railways and highways. Increased taxes imposed by the neighboring city of Cincinnati also encouraged businesses to move to Norwood. Norwood was soon dubbed “the city that industry

built.” More recently, the Rookwood Commons and Pavilion

development has helped to revive local businesses. Norwood delves into this unique city's past, uncovering the people, places, and events that have added to its colorful character. Norwood has long used the tagline “Gem of the Highlands.”

While the origin of this name is not clear, it is believed to refer to Norwood's beautiful locale among the hills and valleys of southwestern Ohio. Norwood got its start in 1809, when Samuel D. Bowman opened a tavern for travelers at the intersection of present-day Montgomery and Smith Roads. During the early 1900s, industries flocked to the area because of easy access to crisscrossing railways and highways. Increased taxes imposed by the neighboring city of Cincinnati also encouraged businesses to move to Norwood. Norwood was soon dubbed “the city that industry

built.” More recently, the Rookwood Commons and Pavilion

development has helped to revive local businesses. Norwood delves into this unique city's past, uncovering the people, places, and events that have added to its colorful character.
  

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Contents

Acknowledgments
6
Sources of Spirituality
21
Neighborhood Events
53
Notable Sights
105
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2006)

Christine Mersch uses more than 200 vintage photographs, drawings, postcards, brochures, and advertisements to showcase this exceptional area. Mersch, a journalist in Cincinnati, has long admired the Norwood area and has had a wonderful time getting to know the community with the help of local residents, the historical society, businesses, schools, and organizations.

Bibliographic information