Everything that Rises: A Book of Convergences

Front Cover
McSweeney's Publishing, 2006 - Art - 232 pages
17 Reviews

From a cuneiform tablet to a Chicago prison, from the depths of the cosmos to the text on our T-shirts, Lawrence Weschler finds strange connections wherever he looks. The farther one travels (through geography, through art, through science, through time), the more everything seems to converge — at least, it does if you're looking through Weschler's giddy, brilliant eyes. Weschler combines his keen insights into art, his years of experience as a chronicler of the fall of Communism, and his triumphs and failures as the father of a teenage girl into a series of essays sure to illuminate, educate, and astound.

 

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Lots of great illustrations. - Goodreads
The intro piece alone is worth three times that much. - Goodreads
Author is a writer for the New Yorker. - Goodreads

Review: Everything That Rises: A Book of Convergences

User Review  - Laura - Goodreads

I didn't get very far into this book, but I liked what I read. It's a compendium of Believer columns about convergences in art. What I read, I liked, but I didn't feel compelled to sit down and read ... Read full review

Review: Everything That Rises: A Book of Convergences

User Review  - h - Goodreads

"You begin to see things that are identifiably yours-and yet, of course, yours in the context of a long tradition which has itself become part of you" (22). hard to imagine a more engaging collection of the wanderings of an educated brain. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
The View from the Prow of the Getty
23
Ilium off the Bowery
33
Copyright

11 other sections not shown

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About the author (2006)

Lawrence Weschler, a staff writer for twenty years at the "New Yorker, " is the Director of the New York Institute of the Humanities at New York University and Artistic Director of the Chicago Humanities Festival.

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