Everything that Rises: A Book of Convergences

Front Cover
McSweeney's Books, 2006 - Art - 232 pages
63 Reviews
From a cuneiform tablet to a Chicago prison, from the depths of the cosmos to the text on our T-shirts, art historian and journalist Lawrence Weschler finds strange connections wherever he looks. The farther one travels (through geography, through art, through science, through time), the more everything seems to converge -- at least, it does through Weschler's giddy, brilliant eyes. Weschler combines his keen insights into art (both contemporary and Renaissance), his years of experience as a chronicler of the fall of Communism, and his triumphs and failures as the father of a teenage girl into a series of essays that are sure to illuminate, educate, and astound.

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cool blending of art history and photography - Goodreads
Lots of great illustrations. - Goodreads
The intro piece alone is worth three times that much. - Goodreads

Review: Everything That Rises: A Book of Convergences

User Review  - Gala - Goodreads

A book that reads like an idiosyncratic scrapbook of observations and collected harmonies from disparate sources. I come from a line of thinkers that make synthesis into a sport, so I really appreciate Weschler's athleticism in this regard. Read full review

Review: Everything That Rises: A Book of Convergences

User Review  - Goodreads

A book that reads like an idiosyncratic scrapbook of observations and collected harmonies from disparate sources. I come from a line of thinkers that make synthesis into a sport, so I really appreciate Weschler's athleticism in this regard. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
The View from the Prow of the Getty
23
Ilium off the Bowery
33
Copyright

11 other sections not shown

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About the author (2006)

Lawrence Weschler lives in New York where he is the director of the New York Institute for the Humanities at NYU.

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