The Charterhouse of Parma, Volumes 1-2

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Boni & Liveright, 1944 - Fiction
16 Reviews
The Charterhouse of Parma (1839) is a compelling novel of passion and daring, of prisons and heroic escape, of political chicanery and sublime personal courage. Set at the beginning of the nineteenth century, amidst the golden landscapes of northern Italy, it traces the joyous but ill-starred amorous exploits of a handsome young aristocrat called Fabrice del Dongo, and of his incomparable aunt Gina, her suitor Prime Minister Mosca, and Clelia, a heroine of ethereal beauty and earthly passion.

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Review: The Charterhouse of Parma

User Review  - SM Sigerson - Goodreads

Stendahl insisted on being buried as an Italian. This novel, set in Italy, focuses on the intrigues of a singular circle of aristocratic friends; whom it's difficult to refer to has hero or heroine ... Read full review

Review: The Charterhouse of Parma

User Review  - Radina Stamenova - Goodreads

I must admit I had a hard time going through the first third of the book as Fabrice seemed to me a very annoying character too young, too stupid, too dependable on other people. Of course, that ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
25
Section 3
45

16 other sections not shown

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About the author (1944)

One of the great French novelists of the nineteenth century, Stendhal describes his unhappy youth with sensitivity and intelligence in his autobiographical novel The Life of Henri Brulard, written in 1835 and 1836 but published in 1890. Long after his death. Stendhal detested his father, a lawyer from Grenoble, France, whose only passion in life was making money. Therefore, Stendhal left home as soon as he could. Stendhal served with Napoleon's army in the campaign in Russia in 1812, which helped inspire the famous war scenes in his novel The Red and the Black (1831). After Napoleon's fall, Stendhal lived for six years in Italy, a country he loved during his entire life. In 1821, he returned to Paris for a life of literature, politics, and love affairs. Stendhal's novels feature heroes who reject any form of authority that would restrain their sense of individual freedom. They are an interesting blend of romantic emotionalism and eighteenth-century realism. Stendhal's heroes are sensitive, emotional individuals who are in conflict with the society in which they live, yet they have the intelligence and detachment to analyze their society and its faults. Stendhal was a precursor of the realism of Flaubert. He once described the novelist's function as that of a person carrying a mirror down a highway so that the mirror would reflect life as it was, for all society.

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