Bombay High Court Reports: Reports of Cases Decided in the High Court of Bombay. I-XII, 1862-1875 (Google eBook)

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Government Central Press, 1867
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Page 251 - ... at any time before issue joined, to pay into court such sum of money as he shall think fit, and thereupon such proceedings shall be had as in other cases where defendants are allowed to pay money into court.
Page 35 - is the property of him who cut away the wood, or who
Page 106 - Plaintiff and the other creditors of the insolvent; that an account might be taken of what was due to the Plaintiff...
Page 271 - Act, be considered preferential charges on his personal property, and be payable thereont in preference to all other debts and liabilities, and, as among themselves, in the following order : — (1.) Expenses of last illness and funeral : (2.) Military debts, namely, sums due in respect of— Quarters ; Mess, Band and other regimental accounts ; Military clothing, appointments and equipments, not exceeding a sum equal to six months...
Page 238 - ... and for a valuable consideration, shall be computed from the time when the fraud first became known to the person injuriously affected thereby...
Page 38 - The earth is not the king's, but is common to all beings enjoying the fruit of their own labour. It belongs, says Jaimini, to all alike : therefore, although a gift of a piece of ground to an individual does take place, the whole land cannot be given by a monarch, nor a province by a subordinate prince ; but house and field, acquired by purchase and similar means, are liable to gift.
Page 94 - There shall be left for every man who cultivates his lands as much as he requires for his own support till the next crop be reaped, and that of his family and for seed. This much shall be left to him, what remains is the land-tax and shall go to the public treasury.
Page 51 - This opinion is supported by the fact that the greater part of the fields, now cultivated by Upris, are recorded in the village books as belonging to absent proprietors ; and affords, when combined with circumstances observed in other parts of the peninsula, and with the light land-tax authorised by Manu, a strong presumption that the revenue system under the Hindus (if they had a uniform system) was founded on private property in the soil.
Page 216 - ... and shall also include, not only such property as shall have been originally in the possession, or under the control, of any party, but also any property, into or for which the same may have been converted or exchanged, and anything acquired by such conversion or exchange, whether immediately or otherwise.
Page 33 - Abandonment has its origin from the contract's being a contract of indemnity. But it is apparent that if the assured might abandon at his pleasure, he might be a gainer to a much greater extent than the value of the loss ; which is inconsistent with a contract of indemnity. * * * * As events have made it at the time when the action was brought, it is but a partial loss.

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