Preventive Detention: A Comparative and International Law Perspective

Front Cover
Brill Academic Pub, 1992 - Law - 302 pages
2 Reviews
Arbitrary arrest and detention have been the most consistent violations of fundamental individual human rights throughout history. The world's major criminal justice systems reveal the historical struggle between monarchs and dictators on the one hand, and advocates of the supremacy of the rule of law on the other. This struggle has been over the power to arbitrarily arrest and detain persons whether they be accused of common or polical crimes. "Preventive Detention: A Comparative and International Law Perspective" seeks to reconcile theory and practice by selecting studies representing different legal systems, thus advancing the multi-disciplinary understanding of the application of international and regional human rights norms in criminal justice systems.

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About the author (1992)

STANISLAW FRANKOWSKI is Professor of Law at the St. Louis University School of Law.

Dinah L. Shelton is the Manatt/Ahn Professor of International Law at the George Washington University Law School and a member of the Inter-American Human Rights Commission of the Organization of American States. Shelton is the author or editor of three prize-winning books: Protecting Human Rights in the Americas (co-authored with Thomas Buergenthal), Remedies in International Human Rights Law, and the three-volume Encyclopedia of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity. She was also awarded the Elisabeth Haub Prize for Environmental Law.

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