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" ... even more so than he deserves. The same age and conditions which produced a Mill in political economy, produced a Mendelssohn in music and a Macaulay in belles-lettres; men who knew almost everything which the past had to give, and suspected little... "
CARMINA GADELICA HYMNS AND INCANTATIONS - Page 332
by ALEXANDER CARMICHAEL - 1900
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The Living Age ..., Volume 160

Eliakim Littell, Robert S. Littell - Language Arts & Disciplines - 1884
...the most correct. Lord Melbourne, a man of great erudition and exquisite judgment, said of him, " 1 wish I were as cock-sure of anything as Tom Macaulay is of everything." Macaulay writes, " that lie would not believe Wraxall's unsupported testimony even when he relates...
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Victorian Literature: Sixty Years of Books and Bookmen

Clement King Shorter - English literature - 1897 - 227 pages
...carried along in an easy manner to positive and undoubting opinions. "I wish," said Lord Melbourne, "that I were as cock-sure of anything as Tom Macaulay is of everything ; " and the remark hit off an undoubted failing, at least from the standpoint of sound and trustworthy...
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Principles of political economy: with some of their applications ..., Volume 1

John Stuart Mill - Economics - 1899
...almost everything which the past had to give, and suspected little or nothing of the future. " I only wish I were as cocksure of anything as Tom Macaulay is of everything," sighed old Lord Melbourne, who had seen too many things to believe that all the wisdom of the world...
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Principles of political economy: with some of their applications ..., Volume 13

John Stuart Mill - Economics - 1899
...almost everything which the past had to give, and suspected little or nothing of the future. " I only wish I were as cocksure of anything as Tom Macaulay is of everything," sighed old Lord Melbourne, who had seen too many things to believe that all the wisdom of the world...
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The Gentleman's Magazine, Volume 287

English periodicals - 1899
...article he had not heard or heeded a certain pithy and pungent remark of Lord Melbourne's " Would God I were as cocksure of anything as Tom Macaulay is of everything." Treitschke's tone is not cocksure enough to have provoked it. Besides, he writes " Schritt fiir Schritt...
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Principles of Political Economy: With Some of Their Applications ..., Volume 1

John Stuart Mill - Economic Resources - 1900
...almost everything which the past had to give, and suspected little or nothing of the future. " I only wish I were as cocksure of anything as Tom Macaulay is of everything," sighed old Lord Melbourne, who had seen too many things to believe that all the wisdom of the world...
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University of Ottawa Review, Volume 7

University of Ottawa - 1904
...wherein, indeed, he surpasses even Lord Macaulay, of whom it was said by one of his enemies : " I wish I were as cocksure of anything as Tom Macaulay is of everything." German critics, one may note, with that curious " contrariness " otherwise " cussedness " which...
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The Archaeology of Israel: Constructing the Past, Interpreting the Present

Neil Asher Silberman, David B. Small - Religion - 1997 - 350 pages
...And a secure chronology is the very integrity of the field. William Lamb, Lord Melbourne once said, 'I wish I were as cocksure of anything as Tom Macaulay is of everything'.2 In both the positive and * As the last speaker at the conference, it fell to me to summarize...
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The Origins of English Words: A Discursive Dictionary of Indo-European Roots

Joseph Twadell Shipley - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2001 - 636 pages
...calls cocksure "a word of contempt." Lord Melbourne is quoted, in Spectator, 30 Nov. 1889, as saying: "I wish I were as cocksure of anything as Tom Macaulay is of everything." At first the word meant simply safe, secure, as though stopped by a cock, a closed faucet; as when...
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